Things I Wish I Would Have Known: Applications

We’re kicking off the 2021 application cycle with a new series written by our Student Admission Ambassadors – everything they wish they would have known! We hope this will be helpful for you as you research law schools, start the application process, and navigate final decisions. 

Vance, Gabby 1

I was just beginning my senior year of college and applying to law school. I was top of my college class and very involved in extra circular activities and held many leadership positions. While I was on top of the world, or so I felt at Elon, my undergraduate institution, I was just like any other applicant applying to William & Mary Law School. So how could I make myself stand out?

Law school admissions deans like Dean Jordan and Dean Smith are reading thousands of applications from many qualified students. Some things, such as a high LSAT, will make your application stand out in a sense, but I have always struggled with standardized tests. I knew my LSAT was not going to be the strongest part of my application. My personal statement and letters of recommendation provided a space where I felt like I could really show the admissions office who I was. But even now, almost three years later, reflecting on the application process, I could have done more to make my application stand out and be the best applicant possible.

When I was applying to schools, I spent so much time describing awards I had received and significant personal accomplishments. That is not a bad thing, it is good to have that information on your application. But, I spent very little time discussing WHY I actually wanted to go to law school and particularly WHY William & Mary Law School. I was one of the weird kids, who knew since they were in Kindergarten that I wanted to be a lawyer. Through various high school and college experiences, that passion only grew. During my junior year of college, I interned at a state prosecutor’s office and worked on a brutal domestic violence case. While the case was on trial, I had an aha moment that is I wanted to do for the rest of my life. So, where was that in my application? My personal statement was about on my study abroad experience, which was great and a very special part of my life, but someone who has to read so many applications will more likely remember that powerful story in the courtroom that impacted me so significantly to where that Plaintiff is who I think of when law school gets really hard. Those stories sell you as not just another candidate but someone who, when the going of law school gets hard, will keep going because they have their “why” and they really want to be here and do this.

Second, it sounds a bit ridiculous, but the law school application process is you advertising and selling yourself as the best applicant, and part of that is saying you interested in the school, in which you are applying to . If there is nowhere on your William & Mary application that signifies you would choose to go to William & Mary, you have ties to Virginia, you like Colonial Williamsburg – you are selling yourself short. Visit the school, call the dean of admissions, research the programs, and email a current student. Taking these steps will show you are not just thinking about law school. You are going to law school and likely this one. William & Mary was my top choice law school, and I knew if I got in, I was going. But why did I say that on my application? Law school admissions deans love when a student is really excited about their school. It means they are doing their job well! If the school is William & Mary, which I hope it is or elsewhere, make sure that they know how badly you want them. It will bolster you application and can help move you in the pile.

Gabby Vance is a 3L from Severna Park, MD, serving as the 0L/1L representative for the Student Bar Association 

Law on the International Stage

Flags

by 2L Yasmine Palmer

Students at William & Mary have the opportunity to take courses on a variety of interesting international topics, taught by professors who are foremost in their field. The Law School offers an International Law Concentration designed to help students specialize in whatever ‘branch’ of international law interests them most.

Interested in human rights law? Take International Criminal Law with Professor Nancy Combs, a former legal advisor at the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal, who has given expert testimony before courts around the world. Interested in the international aspect of business? Take International Business Transactions or Corporations & International Law with Professor Jay Butler, a former legal advisor to the Government of Japan.

Though these are just three of the many international law classes offered, they serve as evidence of the opportunity that one has at William & Mart to get a diverse education in international law. But the opportunities don’t stop there!

Yasmine Palmer at the Hague

International Experiences

Last summer, I interned at the United Nations’ International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals. The Mechanism was created by the UN to takeover and complete the work started by the now-closed International Tribunals for Rwanda and Yugoslavia. It has two locations: one in Arusha, Tanzania and one in The Hague, Netherlands. I worked in The Hague (“Den Haag” in Dutch)!

Serving as a legal intern in the Appeals Division of the Office of the Prosecutor, I spent twelve weeks working on a variety of projects and assignments related to the pending appeal case of the former Bosnian general, Ratko Mladic. Our office was made up of lawyers and interns from around the world, featuring people from places as close by as France and as far away as Hong Kong. Unfortunately, due to confidentiality concerns—it is an active court, after all—I can’t say much else about the actual job. What I will say, though, is that I learned a lot during this internship and developed legal writing and internationally-focused research skills that I hope to apply to my career in the future. I also developed wonderful friendships and professional connections that I could not have made elsewhere.

I’m so thankful to have had an opportunity like this one and, as a law student at William & Mary, you can too!

Professor Christie Warren, Director of the Center for Comparative Legal Studies and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, offers an internship program that provides students with legal internships in countries around the world. Last summer, students went everywhere from Bangladesh to Jordan to South Africa, but she also offers internships at locations right here in the U.S.!

Students who apply to international internships outside of Professor Warren’s program still have many resources at their disposal. I, for example, applied directly to the Mechanism via the UN career portal, but relied heavily on the support of my professors and Office of Career Services advisor. I have no doubt that their guidance helped me to succeed.

If you are a student interested in pursuing a career in international law, William & Mary’s robust academic and experiential offerings might be for you!