My Introduction to Career Services as a 1L

satiraby John Satira, Class of 2017

Starting December 1st, first-year law students can begin applying for their first legal internships. Upon starting law school, I had no idea that the first of December was such a significant date for 1L students. Thankfully, William & Mary Law School’s Office of Career Services (OCS) offered plenty of guidance in helping me prepare for my summer internship search.

I was first introduced to OCS during orientation week in August. At that time, a summer internship was the last thing on my mind. OCS acknowledged that much of our first semester as law students would be spent adapting to the life of a law student. However, the office still encouraged us to use our free time to explore different career opportunities.

To start us off, OCS had each 1L take a career self-assessment test. If I learned anything from the self-assessment, it was that I had no idea what type of law I wanted to pursue. Therefore, I took OCS’s other advice, and I began contacting current attorneys to learn about their experiences. I began to reach out to some contacts I had made as an undergraduate student, and I had some great phone conversations with lawyers in a variety of fields. While I still do not know what exactly I want to do, I have been able to narrow down my areas of interest thanks to the advice of those who I had talked to.

The Office of Career Services Staff

The Office of Career Services Staff

After doing some exploration on my own, OCS began having advisor meetings with 1L students in late October. I cannot describe how truly helpful my OCS advisor meeting was. My advisor and I talked about long-term career prospects and how to begin the summer internship search. She was able to offer me advice on potential summer employers, geographic considerations, and helpful internship listing resources.

In October and November, OCS also gave resume and cover letter lectures to help us refine the manner in which we will present ourselves to employers. I learned a lot at the lectures; needless to say, my resume received a major overhaul! I also used to dread writing cover letters, but the lectures instructed me on how to break down a job description, analyze my own skill set, and write an appropriate cover letter. Now, I am not nearly as intimidated as I used to be.

As December 1st inches closer and closer, I am excited to begin the internship application process. It is time to put all my newly developed internship-search skills to the test!

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First Annual Friendsgiving Celebration

brownby Cathy Brown, Class of 2017

Since Thanksgiving is approaching, I want to say how thankful I am for the sense of community at William & Mary Law School, and specifically within my “firm,” Section 13.

What, you might ask, is a firm?  In the weeks before the 1L class arrived on campus, the Law School sorted us into “firms,” or sections of approximately twelve students.  We have all of our 1L classes with our firms, with our Legal Practice class consisting solely of this small group of twelve.

As most pre-law students probably know, there’s an ugly rumor that law students are ruthless and will stop at nothing to sabotage their classmates in an effort to get a better grade.  With this in mind, I arrived at school with pretty low expectations for my firm-mates.  I was hoping we could at least reach a level of tolerance so maybe – just maybe – I wouldn’t have to watch my back every single minute of the semester.

Fortunately, I couldn’t have been more wrong about my firm, or about the William & Mary community in general.  Everyone here is incredibly nice and really wants me to succeed, and nobody shows this more than the other students in my firm.  My whole section has become friends, and we’ve formed a great support system for each other throughout the past few months.  We help each other get through the week, whether it’s by loaning a charger for a dying laptop, going for takeout when we simply don’t have energy to make dinner, or sharing funny links on Facebook as a study break.  Of course, we also meet up on weekends for dinner, drinks, or a trip to a local pumpkin patch.

This past weekend, however, was by far the most fun I’ve had with my firm.  Weeks ago, we began planning “Friendsgiving,” which, in case you couldn’t guess, is a Thanksgiving dinner with friends.  Since most of us are going home to our families for Thanksgiving itself, we wanted to have an early celebration as a group.  Although we’re all busy with schoolwork and prepping for finals, each of us took time out of our busy schedules to make something to share and to relax with our friends

Friendsgiving buffet

Friendsgiving buffet

One brave soul offered to host and cook a turkey big enough for eighteen people (our entire firm, plus significant others)!  The rest of us contributed side dishes and desserts, ranging from homemade sourdough bread to mashed potatoes, and honey-baked ham to cranberry stuffing.  Needless to say, we were all pretty stuffed by the end of the night!

My contribution: apple pie and pumpkin cream pies

My contribution: apple pie and pumpkin cream pies

Although all the food was delicious, my favorite part of Friendsgiving wasn’t the green bean casserole or cornbread.  Instead, it was the company.  I’m so grateful that my firm bonded so quickly to form a “law school family,” and I’m thankful that I can share my law school experience with all of these great people.

So, until next year (yes, we’ve already decided to make this an annual event!), Happy Friendsgiving!

Section 13, aka: The best firm at the Law School

Section 13, aka: The best firm at the Law School

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Gum J.D. ’16 Recounts Summer Experience in Iraq

Kaylee-Gum

 by Leslie McCullough

Reposted from the William & Mary Law School News, Originally Posted on  October 27, 2014

The primary purpose of an internship is to offer students real-world experience. Few opportunities achieve that goal as profoundly as Kaylee Gum’s summer 2014 internship working to enhance the delivery of legal aid to the Iraqi people.

“It was a very interesting time to be in Iraq,” says Gum, a second-year law student at William & Mary. “As Iraqis look into the next steps for their country, it was interesting to hear local opinions and learn how people perceive the politics, economy, and future of their country.”

Growing up in a military family, Gum spent several years of her childhood abroad, living in Germany and Italy. She enlisted in the Air Force ROTC program and graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2013 with a degree in Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies, then continued directly to law school.

“William & Mary had great credentials and I knew I’d be happy here,” says Gum, who is a second lieutenant and reservist on an Air Force JAG educational delay. “I liked that the school offered lots of international law classes and that there is a lot to do outside the classroom to enjoy a well-rounded experience. Everything I heard was positive and it has all proven to be true.”

Last spring, when Professor Christie Warren, director of the Program in Comparative Legal Studies and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, posted a selection of international internships, Gum applied to go Iraq, the only Middle Eastern country on the list.

“Almost 100 students have participated in international internships since the program began in 2002, but this is the first time anyone has gone to Iraq,” says Warren. “Kaylee’s experience was definitely unique, and she was the perfect match for the opportunity.”

Gum_Iraq_475x265For 12 weeks, Gum worked with two senior legal advisors in the Iraq Access to Justice Program, part of the United States Agency for International Development’s five-year effort to improve access to justice for vulnerable and disadvantaged people in that country.

“I worked on legal aid development within Iraq,” says Gum. “One of my primary projects was to conduct comparative research on legal aid systems in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and the United States. I drafted a document of best practices for delivery of legal aid in an ethical way.”

Her recommendations were provided to an Iraqi organization whose mission is to assist in the on-going development and sustainability of legal aid in the country. She also developed an assessment tool for legal aid clinics to ensure that those best practices are followed. Another part of her responsibilities included teaching the legal aid clinic staff how to write grants to fund their programs.

“I learned a lot about legal aid in general,” says Gum. “It was interesting to see both sides of the process. I had the opportunity to see how vulnerable groups can receive legal assistance and I got to see the inside working of the clinic. It was a perspective I wouldn’t get in the United States.”

Gum’s supervisors were thrilled with her accomplishments.

“Kaylee is thoughtful and analytical, and provided valuable input and feedback,” says Wilson Myers, deputy director of the Iraq Access to Justice Program. “In meetings with civil society, government, and international partners, Kaylee demonstrated professionalism and preparation and an impressive ability to communicate with stakeholders in both Arabic and English.”

The unrest that took place all summer in Iraq made Gum’s internship particularly challenging. She spent the first half of the summer living in Baghdad. During the second half, she was moved to Erbil, a city in Iraq’s northern Kurdish region. Baghdad was no longer safe, and concern mounted when Mosul and surrounding cities in the north fell to ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria). After careful assessment of the developing situation, and in consultation with her supervisors at the Law School and in Iraq, Gum made the decision to stay in the country to complete her internship.

“She handled herself impeccably in a very challenging environment,” says Warren. “Her experience is one of the best examples of why the Comparative Legal Studies and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding Program is so important and useful for the Law School. She benefited and the project benefited.”

“I never really feared for my personal safety and I never felt threatened,” says Gum of her summer experience. “I am very grateful for the opportunity and the contributions that made this experience possible.”

Gum’s internship was supported by a gift from Lois Critchfield, a donor who shares Gum’s interest in the Middle East.

“I’ve been involved with the College for more than 10 years, trying to help students focused on Middle East studies,” says Critchfield. “My long-time interest in the region goes back before Saddam Hussein. I had a career in the CIA, stationed in Jordan, and I made many visits to the embassy in Iraq. Iraq is a wonderful country, and I’m thrilled to be able to help students, like Kaylee, who are interested in helping the Middle East.”

Next summer, Gum will complete a required internship with the Air Force JAG Corps. After graduation, she will serve four years with the Air Force.

“I’d like to go back to the Middle East,” she says. “Ultimately, I want to work in international law.”

Read more about it: Kaylee Gum and other W&M law students who worked at projects around the globe in summer 2014 blogged about their experiences at law.wm.edu/voicesfromthefield. You can go directly to Kaylee’s blog here.

Another View- Supreme Court Preview 2014

brownby Cathy Brown, Class of 2017

In late September, the Institute of Bill of Rights Law at William & Mary Law School hosted its 27th Annual Supreme Court Preview.  This two-day event brought many esteemed legal scholars, journalists, judges, and attorneys to campus to examine the highest court in the land’s docket in its new term, which began in early October.  To my excitement, law students were invited and encouraged to attend as well.

To some, the prospect of attending a series of legal discussions on a Friday evening and Saturday sounds unappealing (especially because, as students, we spend quite a lot of time thinking about the law anyway!).  However, I’m a legal nerd.  In college, I decided to subscribe to not one, but two email bulletins about the Supreme Court of the United States.  Through these updates, I’m notified from October until June whenever the Court so much as sneezes, and certainly whenever the justices grant certiorari to a new case or release an opinion.  I was therefore intrigued by what the Supreme Court Preview would have to offer.

Supreme Court Preview 1The Preview began with a Moot Court demonstration of a case that will go before the Supreme Court this term.  Although many of the intricacies of the case went over my head (I am only a couple months into my law school education, after all!), it was still really interesting to watch seasoned professionals – who have both argued before the Court – deliver compelling oral arguments in one of the lecture halls where I go for class every week.  It was also entertaining to see some of my professors pretending to be the Supreme Court justices presiding over the case and interrupting the attorneys’ arguments to ask a barrage of nuanced questions.

As I already mentioned, I didn’t understand everything that was said at the Supreme Court Preview.  I really shouldn’t be surprised about this; after all, I only have a B.A. in Government and half a semester of law school under my belt, whereas the professions attending the event have dedicated their lives to the legal profession and are preeminent members of the field.  Still, it was inspiring to be sitting among them for a few hours in the same room where I routinely struggle to understand my doctrinal coursework.   Before classes began, members of the law school administration reminded all the incoming 1Ls that our membership in the legal community begins in law school, not with passing the bar exam or arguing our first case.  My experience with the Supreme Court Preview proved this to be true and reminded me that I’m one of many professionals who are eagerly anticipating what the Court has up its sleeve for this new term.

Learn more about our Student Bloggers here.

Supreme Court Preview 2014

liz berryby Liz Berry, Class of 2016

The Institute of Bill of Rights Law held the 27th Annual Supreme Court Preview last month to discuss the upcoming term. The Preview features the people most knowledgeable about the Supreme Court—reporters, scholars, former Solicitor Generals, attorneys who argue in front of the Court, and even judges. It is, to sound slightly nerdy, the star-studded SCOTUS event of the season. As I’m in the Supreme Court Seminar class this semester, I actually had the opportunity to listen and ask questions of two participants– Judge Jeffrey Sutton, 6th Circuit, and Jeff Fisher, mastermind of Riley and co-director of Stanford Law’s Supreme Court Litigation Clinic– before the Preview. It was an incredible experience, as both spoke about topics and cases they were clearly passionate, and very knowledgeable, about.

On Friday, the Institute kicked the Preview off with a moot on the DC and 4th Circuit split over the ACA (a preemptive moot, as the Court has not yet granted certiorari). Andrew J. Pincus and Michael A. Scodro, both of whom have literally argued dozens of times in front of the Court, did an absolutely fantastic job advocating for both sides. Ultimately, the moot Court– with justices ranging from the New York Times Supreme Court reporter Adam Liptak to W&M Professor Allison Orr Larsen, recent star of The Colbert Report –ended in a 5-4 split in favor of the government. While the preview was a great forecast of how the Court might decide, it will be interesting to see if the Court actually grants certiorari.

Supreme Court Preview 2Saturday featured a series of presentations. Panelists spoke on different areas of the law the Court is sure to face this term—civil rights, business, First Amendment, and criminal law. It was truly fascinating to hear the preeminent scholars discuss what the Court will see this season. Some of them (especially in the business section) were actually discussing cases they were going to be arguing this term. Without giving away any of their Court strategy, they were very open about the many facets of the case and what it could mean in the future. Overall, the Preview was highly thought-provoking. All that’s left to do now is see how the Court decides the issues this term.

Learn more about our Student Bloggers here.

1L Tour of Colonial Williamsburg

satiraby John Satira, Class of 2017

I have always considered myself a history buff. I loved going to museums as a child, I enjoyed history classes in high school, and I majored in history in college. In a decision that surprised absolutely no one, I accepted an offer to join one of the most historical law schools in the country: the Marshall-Wythe School of Law. However, during the first few weeks of classes, I was so busy adjusting to life as a law student that I did not have the opportunity to explore and learn about historic Colonial Williamsburg on my own.

Thankfully, William & Mary offered a guided tour for law students to experience the vast history of the Williamsburg community. The event, sponsored specifically for 1L students by the George Wythe Society of Citizen Lawyers, involved an informational stroll around Colonial Williamsburg followed by a reception in the Sir Christopher Wren Building on the William & Mary campus. As if my love of history was not enough to encourage me to attend, Dean Davison Douglas himself was joining the 1L students, so I knew that it would be a worthwhile excursion.

04The event’s attendees were divided into different groups, and we were each led through Colonial Williamsburg by a very energetic and knowledge tour guide. Our tour guide was not alone in guiding the tour, as we met a few colonial reenactors who shared information as well! Some of my favorite informational tidbits include:

  • In colonial times, twice-convicted criminals would not only spend time in the stocks, where their neck and hands would be locked between two planks of wood, but their earlobes would also be nailed to the planks. Ouch!
  • During the Civil War, a Williamsburg citizen with no military rank regularly ordered soldiers to protect the town at all costs. But she was not concerned with her own safety; instead, she believed that Williamsburg was essential in founding the United States and that it must be protected at all costs.
  • Grave robbers that were caught digging in a Colonial Williamsburg cemetery in search of a Masonic treasure map were a partial inspiration for the Nicholas Cage movie National Treasure.

06The tour ended with a presentation by the George Wythe Society featuring Dean Douglas in the Wren Building, and nice reception followed. There was plenty of food and drink for all attendees. During this time, I was able to meet some more of classmates, and I also talked with 2L and 3L students from the George Wythe Society, who really piqued my interest in getting involved with the group.

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed my evening on the George Wythe Society Tour. I was finally exposed to the great history of Williamsburg, I got to interact with my fellow 1L classmates, and had a great dinner. What more could you ask for?

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1L’s Experience During Law Week

greenby Kelly Green, Class of 2017

The first week of law school is like trying to go from sitting still to a full sprint. During Law Week, the law school faculty, staff, and current students did an excellent job facilitating this transition via poignant lectures and, of course, multiple free lunches.

douglasSitting in the Kimball Theatre in Colonial Williamsburg, listening to Dean Douglas deliver his opening speech, which focused on the rich history of the law school as well as the diversity of the class, was an experience that I will remember for the rest of my life. However, I believe the less formal events may end up having the most impact on my future here. Whether it was casual conversations that I had during the ice-cream social with professors or connections that I made throughout the week with my fellow classmates, I now feel a sense of comfort that I know will be needed during my next two years here in Williamsburg.

IMG_0096All in all, Law Week is difficult to describe. It’s tough to put in words the feeling that I got when Dean Douglas handed me my Class of 2017 hat (a tradition here). I can’t begin to describe how nervous and excited I was to participate in my first Torts class with Professor Rajec. What I can say is that I now understand the necessity for Law Week because it helped me feel prepared to take the steps needed to become both a graduate from William and Mary Law School and a successful lawyer.

Learn more about our Student Bloggers here.

Colonial Williamsburg Collegiate Pass

brownby Cathy Brown, Class of 2017

I like being a tourist.  This past summer, I had the chance to drive through sixteen states and a Canadian province on two separate road trips, taking lots of pictures and visiting numerous sites – and gift shops! – along the way.  I was excited to learn, during Law Week, about a special deal that Colonial Williamsburg offers to William & Mary students.  This gem is called a Collegiate Pass and lets me tour the entire historic area for free.  Yes, you read that right.  I can tour and explore dozens of colonial buildings and local art museums as many times as I want, and I don’t have to pay a cent.  With my Collegiate Pass, I can also get bargain admission on special Colonial Williamsburg events, like ghost tours and concerts.  In addition, I can get reduced-price tickets for my parents and friends when they come for a visit.  All I needed to do to get this offer was walk to the Lumber House Ticket Office and present my W&M ID card.

British flags line the street in Colonial Williamsburg.  As the woman who gave me my pass explained, “You’re not in the U.S. anymore.  It hasn’t been created yet!”

British flags line the street in Colonial Williamsburg. As the woman who gave me my pass explained, “You’re not in the U.S. anymore. It hasn’t been created yet!”

In addition to all the historic sites, downtown Williamsburg is also known for its numerous shops and restaurants.  The Collegiate Pass has me covered there too.  As part of my pass, I received a coupon book containing a bunch of good deals for businesses in Merchants Square – including a coupon to the William & Mary bookstore and a BOGO offer on coffee from Blackbird Bakery.  (I may or may not be planning to drink both coffees myself.  Don’t judge.)

Governor’s Palace in Colonial Williamsburg

Governor’s Palace in Colonial Williamsburg

Everyone knows that law school is a rigorous academic environment.  To maintain a healthy and happy life, it’s imperative to take some breaks and pamper yourself from time to time.  Going on “vacation” to a popular tourist destination that’s within walking distance sounds to me like the perfect way to forget about school for a couple of hours.  Especially if it’s free.

Learn more about our Student Bloggers here.

2014-15 Student Bloggers

The Admission Office is lucky to have a number of student bloggers lending their writing talents to us by posting about their law school experiences throughout the year. 

Learn more about them below!

liz berryLiz Berry, Class of 2016

My name is Liz Berry, and I am a 2L from Westfield Center, Ohio. I came to William and Mary directly after graduating from Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio. With a double major in History and Political Science and a Pre-law minor, I was certain I wanted to attend law school. I spent my 1L summer at the Ohio Attorney General, Education Division. At the law school, I’m a member of the William and Mary Law Review, part of the Honor Council, a Student Admissions Ambassador, and a Graduate Fellow. I’m interested in civil litigation and regulatory work. [Read more...]

Summer Experiences: Judicial Intern for the Eastern District of Virginia

BuyrnSue Buyrn is originally from Chesapeake, Virginia. She earned her B.S. from Virginia Tech, double majoring in Philosophy and Psychology. In her second year at the Law school, Sue will be joining the staff of the Journal of Women and the Law, as well as serving as the Community Service Chair for the Student Bar Association.

After hitting the books hard and finally finishing my first year of law school, I was ready to see what the real world had to offer an aspiring lawyer. Knowing that I wanted to practice law in Virginia, I focused on job opportunities in the Commonwealth’s capital city…and I hit the jackpot.

At the conclusion of this summer, I will have spent fourteen weeks interning for Judge David J. Novak, a magistrate judge at the Eastern District of Virginia in Richmond. While in the courtroom, I have observed all of the district court judges preside over a variety of civil and criminal matters: child prostitution, drug distribution, wire fraud, and identity document forgery, just to name a few. I have seen good lawyering and bad lawyering, and as time passes I have been able to identify the habits and skill sets that make an effective attorney.

Outside of the courtroom, I draft bench memoranda that are used to assist in pretrial settlement conferences. I then sit through the conferences with Judge Novak, and he teaches me how to gauge the value of a case. To date, I have been involved in settlement conferences focused on patent infringement and trademark infringement.

Last month, I turned in my first draft of a thirty-one page social security opinion. The issue is whether a man has been rightfully denied social security disability benefits. The case has been appealed four times before it gets to the federal court level. I spent weeks sifting through the plaintiff’s medical records, reading and re-reading the Administrative Law Judge’s opinion, and ultimately considered whether a substantial amount of evidence was provided to rightfully deny benefits to this man. Judge Novak will review the decision I made and offer me guidance on how I analyzed the issues and can better my legal writing skills.

I have never been so appreciative of a job. However, it is not the substantive law or the courtroom spectacle that make this job great. It is the people. Judge Novak and his team, Maria, Frank, Al, and Cheryl, have welcomed me and my fellow interns into chambers like we are a part of their family. They have created a program that has made this summer both educational and entertaining for us, organizing interesting field trips and bringing in outside speakers. In all ways imaginable, they work to help us succeed. Judge Novak and his law clerks have set great examples of what it means to be a citizen lawyer in today’s job market, and I have nothing more to say than thank you.

Summer Experiences: Federal Government in Washington, D.C.

by Liz Rademacher, Class of 2016

lizradLiz Rademacher (Class of 2016) is originally from Newtown, Pennsylvania. She graduated from American University in 2013 with degrees in Law and Society and Psychology. While attending AU, Liz worked as an intern with several different non-profit organizations and government agencies, including the Human Rights Campaign, the American Bar Association’s Death Penalty Representation Project, and the Department of Homeland Security’s Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Her interests include constitutional law, civil rights law, and the intersection of gender and the law. Liz’s passion for public service has motivated her to pursue a career in law, and attending W&M has only strengthened her commitment to helping others.

When I started my summer job search last fall, I wasn’t sure what kind of work I would be doing or where I would be by the time the summer came. I went to college in Washington, DC, and one of my summer job search goals was to find a way to return to the city. I also knew that I was interested in public service and civil rights. Fortunately, William & Mary’s Office of Career Services made it incredibly easy for me to track down these kinds of jobs in the DC metro area and choose between job offers to decide which would be the best opportunity for me.

This summer I’m a legal intern with the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, where I work in the Special Litigation Section (SPL). SPL is an office that investigates and litigates on behalf of the federal government in cases involving the rights of prisoners, juveniles, people with disabilities, people who interact with state and local police departments, and people accessing reproductive health care services. One of the things that I absolutely love about my internship is that it allows to do work with passionate attorneys on a variety of civil rights issues that are really important to me. In just the few weeks that I’ve been at SPL, I’ve already researched and written legal memoranda on civil rights issues, reviewed federal investigations findings, and helped attorneys to draft motions and pleadings at the trial and appellate level. And I still have five weeks left to go!

But it’s not all work. My office matched me up with two mentor attorneys who are always willing to grab coffee and chat, and I work with 12 other interns who love eating lunch by the White House or going to one of DC’s many happy hours after a day at the office. Different attorneys I work with frequently hold career development panels on judicial clerkships, resumes, and networking. DOJ also regularly organizes events for all of its interns, not just my section. A few weeks ago, I got to hear Attorney General Eric Holder speak, and just this week DOJ arranged for interns to take a Supreme Court tour. And when I’m not at the office, I’m exploring DC and taking advantage of all the things the city has to offer.

Ultimately, this internship has introduced me to some amazing people, given me plenty of practical experience working on issues that I care about, and helped me to sharpen my legal skills. Having an internship at an office with such a wonderful internship program has also proven to be a great advantage for me based on the kinds of events I’ve been to and opportunities that I’ve been given this summer. I’ve learned a lot about what it’s like to work with the federal government, and I’m looking forward to coming back to Williamsburg in the fall to continue building on what I’ve learned at DOJ!

Learn more about our Student Bloggers here.

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