My Introduction to Career Services as a 1L

satiraby John Satira, Class of 2017

Starting December 1st, first-year law students can begin applying for their first legal internships. Upon starting law school, I had no idea that the first of December was such a significant date for 1L students. Thankfully, William & Mary Law School’s Office of Career Services (OCS) offered plenty of guidance in helping me prepare for my summer internship search.

I was first introduced to OCS during orientation week in August. At that time, a summer internship was the last thing on my mind. OCS acknowledged that much of our first semester as law students would be spent adapting to the life of a law student. However, the office still encouraged us to use our free time to explore different career opportunities.

To start us off, OCS had each 1L take a career self-assessment test. If I learned anything from the self-assessment, it was that I had no idea what type of law I wanted to pursue. Therefore, I took OCS’s other advice, and I began contacting current attorneys to learn about their experiences. I began to reach out to some contacts I had made as an undergraduate student, and I had some great phone conversations with lawyers in a variety of fields. While I still do not know what exactly I want to do, I have been able to narrow down my areas of interest thanks to the advice of those who I had talked to.

The Office of Career Services Staff

The Office of Career Services Staff

After doing some exploration on my own, OCS began having advisor meetings with 1L students in late October. I cannot describe how truly helpful my OCS advisor meeting was. My advisor and I talked about long-term career prospects and how to begin the summer internship search. She was able to offer me advice on potential summer employers, geographic considerations, and helpful internship listing resources.

In October and November, OCS also gave resume and cover letter lectures to help us refine the manner in which we will present ourselves to employers. I learned a lot at the lectures; needless to say, my resume received a major overhaul! I also used to dread writing cover letters, but the lectures instructed me on how to break down a job description, analyze my own skill set, and write an appropriate cover letter. Now, I am not nearly as intimidated as I used to be.

As December 1st inches closer and closer, I am excited to begin the internship application process. It is time to put all my newly developed internship-search skills to the test!

Learn more about our Student Bloggers here.

Gum J.D. ’16 Recounts Summer Experience in Iraq

Kaylee-Gum

 by Leslie McCullough

Reposted from the William & Mary Law School News, Originally Posted on  October 27, 2014

The primary purpose of an internship is to offer students real-world experience. Few opportunities achieve that goal as profoundly as Kaylee Gum’s summer 2014 internship working to enhance the delivery of legal aid to the Iraqi people.

“It was a very interesting time to be in Iraq,” says Gum, a second-year law student at William & Mary. “As Iraqis look into the next steps for their country, it was interesting to hear local opinions and learn how people perceive the politics, economy, and future of their country.”

Growing up in a military family, Gum spent several years of her childhood abroad, living in Germany and Italy. She enlisted in the Air Force ROTC program and graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2013 with a degree in Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies, then continued directly to law school.

“William & Mary had great credentials and I knew I’d be happy here,” says Gum, who is a second lieutenant and reservist on an Air Force JAG educational delay. “I liked that the school offered lots of international law classes and that there is a lot to do outside the classroom to enjoy a well-rounded experience. Everything I heard was positive and it has all proven to be true.”

Last spring, when Professor Christie Warren, director of the Program in Comparative Legal Studies and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, posted a selection of international internships, Gum applied to go Iraq, the only Middle Eastern country on the list.

“Almost 100 students have participated in international internships since the program began in 2002, but this is the first time anyone has gone to Iraq,” says Warren. “Kaylee’s experience was definitely unique, and she was the perfect match for the opportunity.”

Gum_Iraq_475x265For 12 weeks, Gum worked with two senior legal advisors in the Iraq Access to Justice Program, part of the United States Agency for International Development’s five-year effort to improve access to justice for vulnerable and disadvantaged people in that country.

“I worked on legal aid development within Iraq,” says Gum. “One of my primary projects was to conduct comparative research on legal aid systems in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and the United States. I drafted a document of best practices for delivery of legal aid in an ethical way.”

Her recommendations were provided to an Iraqi organization whose mission is to assist in the on-going development and sustainability of legal aid in the country. She also developed an assessment tool for legal aid clinics to ensure that those best practices are followed. Another part of her responsibilities included teaching the legal aid clinic staff how to write grants to fund their programs.

“I learned a lot about legal aid in general,” says Gum. “It was interesting to see both sides of the process. I had the opportunity to see how vulnerable groups can receive legal assistance and I got to see the inside working of the clinic. It was a perspective I wouldn’t get in the United States.”

Gum’s supervisors were thrilled with her accomplishments.

“Kaylee is thoughtful and analytical, and provided valuable input and feedback,” says Wilson Myers, deputy director of the Iraq Access to Justice Program. “In meetings with civil society, government, and international partners, Kaylee demonstrated professionalism and preparation and an impressive ability to communicate with stakeholders in both Arabic and English.”

The unrest that took place all summer in Iraq made Gum’s internship particularly challenging. She spent the first half of the summer living in Baghdad. During the second half, she was moved to Erbil, a city in Iraq’s northern Kurdish region. Baghdad was no longer safe, and concern mounted when Mosul and surrounding cities in the north fell to ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria). After careful assessment of the developing situation, and in consultation with her supervisors at the Law School and in Iraq, Gum made the decision to stay in the country to complete her internship.

“She handled herself impeccably in a very challenging environment,” says Warren. “Her experience is one of the best examples of why the Comparative Legal Studies and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding Program is so important and useful for the Law School. She benefited and the project benefited.”

“I never really feared for my personal safety and I never felt threatened,” says Gum of her summer experience. “I am very grateful for the opportunity and the contributions that made this experience possible.”

Gum’s internship was supported by a gift from Lois Critchfield, a donor who shares Gum’s interest in the Middle East.

“I’ve been involved with the College for more than 10 years, trying to help students focused on Middle East studies,” says Critchfield. “My long-time interest in the region goes back before Saddam Hussein. I had a career in the CIA, stationed in Jordan, and I made many visits to the embassy in Iraq. Iraq is a wonderful country, and I’m thrilled to be able to help students, like Kaylee, who are interested in helping the Middle East.”

Next summer, Gum will complete a required internship with the Air Force JAG Corps. After graduation, she will serve four years with the Air Force.

“I’d like to go back to the Middle East,” she says. “Ultimately, I want to work in international law.”

Read more about it: Kaylee Gum and other W&M law students who worked at projects around the globe in summer 2014 blogged about their experiences at law.wm.edu/voicesfromthefield. You can go directly to Kaylee’s blog here.

Summer Experiences: Judicial Intern for the Eastern District of Virginia

BuyrnSue Buyrn is originally from Chesapeake, Virginia. She earned her B.S. from Virginia Tech, double majoring in Philosophy and Psychology. In her second year at the Law school, Sue will be joining the staff of the Journal of Women and the Law, as well as serving as the Community Service Chair for the Student Bar Association.

After hitting the books hard and finally finishing my first year of law school, I was ready to see what the real world had to offer an aspiring lawyer. Knowing that I wanted to practice law in Virginia, I focused on job opportunities in the Commonwealth’s capital city…and I hit the jackpot.

At the conclusion of this summer, I will have spent fourteen weeks interning for Judge David J. Novak, a magistrate judge at the Eastern District of Virginia in Richmond. While in the courtroom, I have observed all of the district court judges preside over a variety of civil and criminal matters: child prostitution, drug distribution, wire fraud, and identity document forgery, just to name a few. I have seen good lawyering and bad lawyering, and as time passes I have been able to identify the habits and skill sets that make an effective attorney.

Outside of the courtroom, I draft bench memoranda that are used to assist in pretrial settlement conferences. I then sit through the conferences with Judge Novak, and he teaches me how to gauge the value of a case. To date, I have been involved in settlement conferences focused on patent infringement and trademark infringement.

Last month, I turned in my first draft of a thirty-one page social security opinion. The issue is whether a man has been rightfully denied social security disability benefits. The case has been appealed four times before it gets to the federal court level. I spent weeks sifting through the plaintiff’s medical records, reading and re-reading the Administrative Law Judge’s opinion, and ultimately considered whether a substantial amount of evidence was provided to rightfully deny benefits to this man. Judge Novak will review the decision I made and offer me guidance on how I analyzed the issues and can better my legal writing skills.

I have never been so appreciative of a job. However, it is not the substantive law or the courtroom spectacle that make this job great. It is the people. Judge Novak and his team, Maria, Frank, Al, and Cheryl, have welcomed me and my fellow interns into chambers like we are a part of their family. They have created a program that has made this summer both educational and entertaining for us, organizing interesting field trips and bringing in outside speakers. In all ways imaginable, they work to help us succeed. Judge Novak and his law clerks have set great examples of what it means to be a citizen lawyer in today’s job market, and I have nothing more to say than thank you.

Summer Experiences: Circuit Court in MD

cooperMatthew Cooper is originally from Elkton, Maryland.  He earned his B.A. from Virginia Tech in 2013 with his major in Political Science.  As a 2L, Matt will be working on the staff of the William & Mary Business Law Review and as a member of the Alternative Dispute Resolution Team.  Matt is currently interested in the fields of contract law and general business litigation, including both construction and government contracts.

After seven years of exposure to the law and life inside a private-practice firm, I entered my first year of law school with the goal of obtaining a judicial internship.  Being familiar with the process of an individual first obtaining legal representation and then finally having their dispute either settle outside of court or litigated in court, instilled in me the desire for gaining knowledge of how the process works from beginning to end in the court system.  As a result, I have spent my summer as a judicial intern for the Honorable Jane Cairns Murray at the Circuit Court for Cecil County in Maryland.

The experience and skills I have gained as a judicial intern for Judge Murray have been unbelievably rewarding.  As a judge at the state trial level, Judge Murray oversees a wide range of both civil and criminal litigation matters.  Among the most common areas of law that I have been exposed to in Judge Murray’s chambers include family law, criminal law, and estates and trusts.  The internship has been a phenomenal supplement to my first-year of law school, as I have been able to work on complex legal issues that I spent my first year of law school learning and studying.

From my first day on the job, Judge Murray has demonstrated complete confidence in my legal research and writing abilities.  I have drafted countless memoranda, and I have even drafted an Opinion on a complex civil procedure issue surrounding a riparian rights dispute on the Chesapeake Bay.  I have also had the opportunity to observe voir dire and the interviewing of potential jurors before a criminal jury trial, as well as assisting in the formulation of jury instructions in accordance with the Maryland Criminal Pattern Jury Instructions.  When I am not conducting legal research or drafting memoranda and Orders, I spend a significant portion of time in court observing trials and assisting Judge Murray on a myriad of different areas of the law.  Being able to view how different lawyers litigate, including how they formulate opening statements, motions, and closings, and then being able to discuss with the Judge exactly what she was thinking and seeing on the bench has been a truly invaluable experience.  The skills and knowledge that I have obtained as a judicial intern will be helpful as I enter my second-year at William & Mary and begin my fall externship with Kaufman & Canoles.

 

Summer Experiences: Federal Government in Washington, D.C.

by Liz Rademacher, Class of 2016

lizradLiz Rademacher (Class of 2016) is originally from Newtown, Pennsylvania. She graduated from American University in 2013 with degrees in Law and Society and Psychology. While attending AU, Liz worked as an intern with several different non-profit organizations and government agencies, including the Human Rights Campaign, the American Bar Association’s Death Penalty Representation Project, and the Department of Homeland Security’s Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Her interests include constitutional law, civil rights law, and the intersection of gender and the law. Liz’s passion for public service has motivated her to pursue a career in law, and attending W&M has only strengthened her commitment to helping others.

When I started my summer job search last fall, I wasn’t sure what kind of work I would be doing or where I would be by the time the summer came. I went to college in Washington, DC, and one of my summer job search goals was to find a way to return to the city. I also knew that I was interested in public service and civil rights. Fortunately, William & Mary’s Office of Career Services made it incredibly easy for me to track down these kinds of jobs in the DC metro area and choose between job offers to decide which would be the best opportunity for me.

This summer I’m a legal intern with the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, where I work in the Special Litigation Section (SPL). SPL is an office that investigates and litigates on behalf of the federal government in cases involving the rights of prisoners, juveniles, people with disabilities, people who interact with state and local police departments, and people accessing reproductive health care services. One of the things that I absolutely love about my internship is that it allows to do work with passionate attorneys on a variety of civil rights issues that are really important to me. In just the few weeks that I’ve been at SPL, I’ve already researched and written legal memoranda on civil rights issues, reviewed federal investigations findings, and helped attorneys to draft motions and pleadings at the trial and appellate level. And I still have five weeks left to go!

But it’s not all work. My office matched me up with two mentor attorneys who are always willing to grab coffee and chat, and I work with 12 other interns who love eating lunch by the White House or going to one of DC’s many happy hours after a day at the office. Different attorneys I work with frequently hold career development panels on judicial clerkships, resumes, and networking. DOJ also regularly organizes events for all of its interns, not just my section. A few weeks ago, I got to hear Attorney General Eric Holder speak, and just this week DOJ arranged for interns to take a Supreme Court tour. And when I’m not at the office, I’m exploring DC and taking advantage of all the things the city has to offer.

Ultimately, this internship has introduced me to some amazing people, given me plenty of practical experience working on issues that I care about, and helped me to sharpen my legal skills. Having an internship at an office with such a wonderful internship program has also proven to be a great advantage for me based on the kinds of events I’ve been to and opportunities that I’ve been given this summer. I’ve learned a lot about what it’s like to work with the federal government, and I’m looking forward to coming back to Williamsburg in the fall to continue building on what I’ve learned at DOJ!

Learn more about our Student Bloggers here.

Summer Experiences: Law Firm in Silicon Valley

focarinoBrian Focarino is originally from Fairfax Station, Virginia. He earned his B.A. from William & Mary with majors in government and linguistics, and his M.Sc. in linguistics from the University of Edinburgh. As a 3L, Brian will be a member of the W&M Appellate & Supreme Court Clinic and serve as Executive Editor of the Law School’s Business Law Review.

I’m spending my 2L summer in Silicon Valley as a summer associate at Cooley, a firm headquartered in Palo Alto, CA. At Cooley, my work focuses on trademark, copyright and advertising litigation, intellectual property litigation and general business litigation, in addition to pro bono matters. I’ve worked on a host of litigation projects for the world’s most exciting established and emerging companies. In six weeks, I’ve written memos on the copyright implications of viral memes, trademark issues with new mobile “apps,” unique questions relating to shareholder derivative suits, and private and public company securities litigation. I’ve attended court and client meetings, and completed training in topics such as the lifecycle of companies and the anatomy of an initial public offering.

Cooler still, I’ve had meaningful exposure to pro bono work, participating in a legal aid clinic in rural Marin County, California, a housing clinic in San Francisco, and contributing to an affirmative application for political asylum on behalf of one of Cooley’s pro bono clients. Outside the office, I’ve spent time on Monterey Bay with all of the firm’s summer associates from across the country, attended countless events and mixers hosted by the firm, met brilliant lawyers, and made some incredible friends.

I’ve been thinking all summer about how cool it is that America’s oldest law school prepares its students to practice all kinds of law, for all kinds of clients, in all kinds of environments, all over the world. Because of that, jumping between Colonial Williamsburg and Silicon Valley couldn’t be easier. I’m having an eye-opening summer, and I owe it to William & Mary for helping prepare me to make the most of it.

Here are Brian’s other posts: Halfway Through BBQ, Thanks, and Meet a Member of the Class of 2015!

A Recent Grad Looks Back

by Laura Vlieg, Class of 2014

Laura Vlieg graduated from W&M Law School this May with the class of 2014. Prior to law school she attended Loyola University Chicago completing majors in Political Science and International Studies, and then worked for a year with an aviation law firm in Washington, DC. This August, she will be starting a position with Obadal, Filler, MacLeod & Klein in Alexandria, VA. 

GraduationPicWell, three years have passed, and I am now the proud owner of a very fancy piece of paper conferring my J.D., and a pretty cool hat to boot.

My time at William & Mary Law was both challenging and rewarding, and I think I will always look back with a little bit of nostalgia, and a lot of relief that I not only survived law school, but thrived. My successes were due largely in part to the wonderful people and the support offered here at W&M, and I will always be happy that I chose such a supportive environment to spend these past three academically intense years.

I am now in the thick of studying for the bar exam, and there are certainly days where my fellow graduates and I throw up our hands and say “Why am I doing this to myself?!” However, I quickly remember the reason when I look ahead to August, when I will be starting my new job in the DC area. I came into law school hoping to work toward a career in aviation law, even though I knew it would be difficult to break into such a niche field in a tough economy. I can happily report that come August, I will be starting a job with a small firm in Alexandria, VA specializing in regulatory work in the field of aviation.

In addition to giving me a solid education and opportunities that helped me lock down my dream job, W&M enabled me to have some fun along the way as well. In my time here I was able to sing alongside some fellow recreational musicians in Law Cappella; teach eager middle and high schoolers about the Constitution through both Constitutional Conversations and the Constitutional Literacy programs; perform primary source research on constitutional history and documents for a nonprofit called ConSource for academic credit (yes, I consider that very fun); and of course participate in myriad social events hosted by student groups such as Barrister’s Ball, the PSF Auction, and so many others.

As I look back fondly on my time here at W&M, I hope you are looking forward to an equally rewarding three years!

Read Laura’s first semester reflection and her experience as a Graduate Research Fellow.

Summer Experiences: Law Firms in WV & NH

sheaBrian Shea is originally from Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. He received his B.A. from Dartmouth College in Government with a minor in Spanish. At William & Mary, Brian is the Editor-in-Chief of the William & Mary Business Law Review and a member of the Law School Honor Council. 

After working at a law firm in New York City for two years before law school, I knew that the law firm environment was where I wanted to end up. I took advantage of the law school’s on-campus interview program during the winter of my 1L year, and landed a summer associateship at Steptoe & Johnson in Bridgeport, West Virginia. At Steptoe I gained exposure to a variety of corporate and business litigation matters, the majority of which stemmed from West Virginia’s booming coal and natural gas industries. I have always been interested in the legal and compliance concerns of the energy sector, given the robust regulatory regime that governs it and the often contentious political climate that surrounds it. Steptoe afforded me exposure to a range of issues relevant to its energy clients, everything from eminent domain and lease disputes to bankruptcy and antitrust.

This summer I am working at McLane Law Firm, a mid-sized firm in Manchester, New Hampshire, close to my family and geographically where I hope to settle. Unlike larger firms, McLane hires associates into just two practice tracks–corporate and litigation. My focus has been primarily corporate, and after six weeks, I have already been staffed on several M&A transactions, as well as securities, tax, and corporate governance matters. By working at McLane, I hope to emerge with a more robust corporate skill set than I might at a larger firm with specialized, discrete practice areas. The most personally impactful aspect of my summer, however, has been the opportunity to work with several of McLane’s pro bono clients, helping them to navigate complex issues of personal bankruptcy and post-divorce asset distribution. It is particularly rewarding to know that my legal training can have a meaningful and positive impact on individuals living in the state where I grew up. My summer has certainly helped to fortify my sense of what it means to be a Citizen Lawyer.

I look forward to returning to William & Mary in the fall to build upon my practical business acumen as an extern at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, and by participating in the law school’s Federal Tax Clinic.

Summer Experiences: House Judiciary Committee

lukishTom Lukish is originally from Richmond, Virginia.  Choosing to remain in the Commonwealth for his undergraduate studies, Tom graduated from Virginia Tech in 2013 with a B.A. in Political Science.  In his second year at the Law School, Tom will be joining the staff of the William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal, as well as serving on the Board of William & Mary’s chapter of the Virginia Bar Association.

One of the many wonderful things about William & Mary is the incredible Office of Career Services (OCS).  In the first meeting with my counselor, Dean George Podolin, the two of us discussed my hobbies, interests, career goals, and a number of things in between.  Upon learning of my desire to become involved with the federal government, Dean Podolin suggested that I do two things: research a variety of avenues to our nation’s capital, and reach out to individuals in government whom I have met over the years.  Very fortunately, I applied to and was offered a position with the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary.

The House Judiciary Committee passes a high number of bills each year, and it has been an absolute pleasure to assist counsel, staff, and Members of the Committee in their effort.  Addressing a variety of areas of the law, the Committee regularly holds hearings and drafts legislation relating to the U.S. Constitution, crime, homeland security, immigration, and intellectual property.

Thus far, my experience with the Committee has been nothing short of spectacular.  Placed within the Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security, I have been able to use the writing, communication, and research training I gained at W&M to help Congress address one of the nation’s most pertinent issues.

One of the more thrilling aspects of this position is that each day presents something new.  No day is identical to the last for many offices on Capitol Hill, and while subcommittees remain consistent in terms of their overarching focus, the same is true for Members and staff of the House Judiciary Committee.  The myriad of current events and challenges facing this country, in combination with the inherent excitement that accompanies the Hill, has made for an unforgettable experience.  I could not be more appreciative of the opportunity to use my legal education to enter the world of American politics and public service.

Very thankful for what OCS and the entire W&M Law community has helped me with thus far, I hope that my experience in Washington will encourage other students interested in government to look into the plethora of opportunities that exist in D.C.  It is a tremendous feeling working in a way that serves the country as a whole, and I look forward to hopefully working in or around government in the future.

Summer Experiences: Law Clerk at Ohio Attorney General

liz berryLiz Berry is originally from Westfield Center, Ohio. She earned her B.A. from Otterbein University, double majoring in History and Political Science. She is spending her 1L summer at the Ohio Attorney General, Education Division.

Since I’m sure everyone reading this blog post has been diligently following me since I began my writing career for the Admissions Office last autumn, you may consider this an addendum to “May the Internships be Ever in Your Favor.” Because I really lucked out and landed a great one.

I’m spending my summer as a law clerk with the Ohio Attorney General. And in case you’re like my friends and asking “how’s it feel to put people in jail?” let me just clarify by stating that I’m working in the Education Division. And really, truly, honestly, I promise. We do not put people in jail. Or at least we haven’t in the seven weeks I’ve been working.

My section represents the 30+ public colleges and universities in the state of Ohio, as well as the Ohio Department of Education. We deal with lawsuits by or against the colleges, can be used by the colleges as general counsel if so desired, and we also litigate teaching licensing and child nutrition hearings. My mentor and I joke that the section is more like a litigation firm than anything else. And luckily for me, that means there’s plenty of substantive legal work to do.

So what have I been up to this summer? Plenty of research and memo assignments on general legal topics…having a working knowledge of Civ Pro and Contracts has definitely come in handy. I’ve had the opportunity to work on two briefs for administrative hearings and also write my own (supervised) motion to dismiss! Needless to say, it was really exciting that they trusted me enough to draft work with the AG’s name on it. The program has also provided plenty of out-of-the-office experiences. I’ve been able to attend several court sessions (our section was actually involved in a three week federal jury trial where I was put on the stand! (only to read a deposition but it still counts)), administrative hearings, and even sit in on a settlement. The law clerks have met the AG, judges, court clerks, and been able to attend resume and writing workshops. It’s been a busy summer, and I’m almost disappointed that there are only four weeks left. Still, I’m excited to get back to W&M to see what opportunities 2L year will bring!

Public Service Fellowships, Summer 2014

logo

William & Mary Law School awarded $335,395 – the most ever awarded by the Law School – to 109 students for public service fellowships during Summer 2014.  Students will assist 98 organizations in 16 states, the District of Columbia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Cote d’Ivoire, Indonesia, Iraq, Italy, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Lithuania, Morocco, The Netherlands, South Africa, and Spain.

A-007Arts

  • Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts (New York, NY)

Aviation and Maritime Commerce

  • U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division, Torts Branch, Aviation and Admiralty Section (Washington, DC)

Child Advocacy and Protection

  • Legal Aid Justice Center, Just Children Program (Richmond, VA)
  • Legal Aid Society, Juvenile Rights Practice (New York, NY)
  • Partnership for Children’s Rights (New York, NY)

 Civil Legal Aid

  • Bet Tzedek Summer for Justice Program (Los Angeles, CA)
  • Community Legal Services (Philadelphia, PA)
  • Legal Aid of North Carolina (Greenville, NC)
  • Legal Aid Society of Eastern Virginia (Norfolk, VA)
  • Legal Aid Society of Eastern Virginia (Williamsburg, VA) (2)
  • Texas Appleseed (Austin, TX)

Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

  • American Civil Liberties Union of Virginia Foundation, LGBT Civil Rights Summer (Richmond, VA)
  • National Center for Lesbian Rights (Washington, DC)
  • New York Attorney General, Civil Rights Bureau (New York, NY)
  • U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Appellate Section (Washington, DC)
  • U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Disability Rights Section (Washington, DC)
  • U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Special Litigation Section (Washington, DC)

Comparative Constitutional Law

  • Conreason Project (Madrid, Spain)

Diplomacy

  • U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs (Washington, DC)

Election

  • Fair Vote (Takoma Park, MD)
  • Federal Election Commission (Washington, DC)
  • National Conference of State Legislatures, Campaign Finance Legal Department (Denver, CO)
  • National Conference of State Legislatures, Campaign Finance Legal Department, Candidates and Campaigns Legal Department (Denver, CO)

Environmental

  • Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (Tallahassee, FL)
  • U.S. Department of Justice, Environmental and Natural Resources Division, Environmental Defense Section (Washington, DC)
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Enforcement and Compliance (Washington, DC) (2)
  • Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bangladesh Ceracean Diversity Project (Sonadanga, Bangladesh)

Federal Government: U.S. Supreme Court Litigation

  • U.S. Department of Justice, Office of the Solicitor General (Washington, DC)

Financial and Business Regulation

  • U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Division of Corporation Finance (Washington, DC)
  • U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Division of Enforcement (Washington, DC) (2)

Health Care

  • Legal Information Network for Cancer (Richmond, VA) (2)
  • Legal Services of Southern Piedmont, Family Support and Healthcare Division (Charlotte, NC)

Immigration

  • Capital Area Immigrants’ Rights Coalition, Detained Children’s Program (Washington, DC)

Indigent Criminal Defense:  Federal

  • Federal Public Defender, Eastern District of Virginia (Norfolk, VA)

IMG_2469Indigent Criminal Defense:  State and Local

  • Charlottesville Public Defender (Charlottesville, VA)
  • Fredericksburg Public Defender (Fredericksburg, VA)
  • Hampton Public Defender (Hampton, VA)
  • Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy (Newport, KY)
  • Monroe County Public Defender (Rochester, NY)
  • Norfolk Public Defender (Norfolk, VA) (2)
  • Public Defender of Metropolitan Nashville & Davidson County (Nashville, TN)
  • Richmond Public Defender (Richmond, VA)
  • Schuylkill County Public Defender (Pottsville, PA)
  • New Hampshire Public Defender (Concord, NH)
  • Virginia Capital Representation Resource Center (Charlottesville, VA)

International Human Rights

  • Iran Human Rights Documentation Center (New Haven, CT)

Judiciary

  • Alexandria Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court (Alexandria, VA)
  • Hampton Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court (Hampton, VA)
  • The Honorable David G. Larimer. Western District of New York (Rochester, NY)
  • The Honorable David J. Novak, Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond, VA)
  • The Honorable Sarah Ellis, Northern District of Illinois (Chicago, IL)

Labor and Employment

National Labor Relations Board (Baltimore, MD)

  • North Carolina Department of Justice, Attorney General’s Office, Labor Section (Raleigh, NC)
  • U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Chicago, IL)

Military Justice

  • U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Maritime and International Law (Washington, DC)
  • U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General Corps, Navy-Marine Corps Court of Criminal Appeals (Washington, DC)

Post Conflict Peacebuilding/Rule of Law (funded by William & Mary Law School’s Program in Comparative Legal Studies and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding)

  • American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative, Morocco (Rabat, Morocco)
  • Beijing Children’s Legal Aid Research Center (Beijing, China)
  • Center for Legal Aid and Regional Development (Pristina, Kosovo)
  • Center for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Transitional Justice (Cape Town, South Africa)
  • Democracy for Development (Pristina, Kosovo)
  • East West Management Institute (Baku, Azerbaijan)
  • East West Management Institute (Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan)
  • East West Management Institute (Phnom Penh, Cambodia) (2)
  • International Bridges to Justice (Phnom Penh, Cambodia) (2)
  • International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (The Hague, Netherlands)
  • International Law Development Organization (Rome, Italy)
  • International Center for Transitional Justice (New York, NY)
  • International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (The Hague, Netherlands)
  • Law Institute of Lithuania (Vilnius, Lithuania)
  • National Center for State Courts, International Programs Division (Arlington, VA)
  • People Against Suffering, Poverty and Oppression (Cape Town, South Africa)
  • PUSAKO Center for Constitutional Studies (Padang, Indonesia)
  • Tetra Tech DPK Access to Justice Program (Baghdad, Iraq)
  • Tetra Tech DPK Justice Sector Support Program (Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire)
  • United States Institute of Peace (Washington, DC)

Prosecution: Federal

  • U.S. Attorney, District of Columbia (Washington, DC) (2)
  • U.S. Attorney, District of Nebraska, (Omaha, NE)
  • U.S. Attorney, Eastern District of Virginia (Newport News, VA)
  • U.S. Attorney, Eastern District of Virginia, (Norfolk, VA)
  • U.S. Attorney, Southern District of West Virginia, (Beckley, WV)
  • U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, Fraud Section (Washington, DC)

BushrodMootCourt2014 (58)Prosecution: State and Local

  • Baltimore City State’s Attorney (Baltimore, MD)
  • Colonial Heights Commonwealth’s Attorney (Colonial Heights, VA)
  • Hampton Commonwealth’s Attorney (Hampton, VA) (2)
  • Harris County District Attorney, Human Trafficking and Juvenile Justice Division (Houston, TX)
  • Louisa County Commonwealth’s Attorney (Louisa, VA)
  • Nassau County District Attorney (Mineola, NY)
  • New Kent County Commonwealth’s Attorney (New Kent, VA)
  • Norfolk Commonwealth’s Attorney (Norfolk, VA) (2)
  • Prince George’s County State’s Attorney, Domestic Violence Unit (Upper Marlboro, MD)
  • Shelby County Attorney General (Memphis, TN)
  • State’s Attorney, Ninth Judicial Circuit, Homicide Division (Orlando, FL)
  • Virginia Attorney General, Public Safety and Enforcement Division, Computer Crime Section (Richmond, VA)

Research Compliance

  • George Mason University, Office of Research Integrity and Assurance (Fairfax, VA)

State and Local Government: Civil

  • Maryland Attorney General, Department of Human Resources (Baltimore, MD)
  • Nassau County Attorney (Mineola, NY) (2)
  • Spotsylvania County Attorney (Spotsylvania, VA)
free samples free stuff Buy Generic Levitra Vardenafil Online 10mg 20mg 40mg Lowest Price Generic Viagra Order Online Treatment drugs for Alcoholism A general treatment drug for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Buy Analgesic drugs online buy Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs online Buy cheap Antiallergic drugs Buy antibiotics online without prescription order Sedative and anticonvulsant drugs Antidepressants Drug order online Best Antifungal drugs online Buy Antiparasitic Medication online Buy Cheap Anti Viral Drugs Online buy Drug treatments for arthritis Asthma Medications and Treatments order Birth Control Contraception Medication online Cancer Drug buy cheap drug for Cardiovascular diseases treatment buy High Cholesterol Medication online Generic drugs for diabetes treatment Buy Generic Diuretics No Prescription online order drugs for erectile dysfunction treatment order Best Eye Care drugs online Gastrointestinal tract disorders drug buy Currently Approved Drugs for HIV buy Drugs and Medications to Treat Hypertension Erectile Dysfunction Drugs online buy mental disorders treatment medication buy Migraine Medication online Prescription Muscle Relaxers medication online buy Neurological Disorder Treatment drug Drug treatments for obesity online buy drug for Effective Osteoporosis Treatment Respiratory tract infection treatment Buy Skin Care medication online buy Medication to help you quit smoking Buy cheap surgery drugs online Drugs used treatment urinary tract infection generic drugs for Women's Health buy Generic Cialis Jelly online buy erectile dysfunction medications trial packs viagra cialis levitra