Making the Journey Together: Claire and Justin’s Story

zimmermanby Liesel Zimmerman, Class of 2018

Every year around Valentine’s Day, Get Wythe It shares the stories of students who are in love in law school, and that number is even higher than you may think. Statistically speaking, over 25% of William & Mary alumni end up marrying each other! While most meet their future spouses on one of William & Mary’s campuses, 2Ls Claire Hunter and Justin Lashley were already ahead of the curve when they applied. Having met in undergrad, they knew that the best way to tackle the struggles and triumphs of law school would be to do it together.

Justin and Claire first met during their sophomore year at Dartmouth College. At that time they knew each other as friendly acquaintances; it wasn’t until the fall of their senior year that they reconnected and started dating. Justin was the Treasurer of his fraternity, and Claire was the President of her sorority. In true fairy tale fashion, their organizations’ houses were right across the street from one another. As their undergraduate careers were ending, their story was just beginning.

JustinClaireAfter graduation, Justin and Claire worked in New York City for a year. Claire, originally from Australia, wanted to be closer to her family, so she and Justin then got jobs in Sydney. Justin was grateful for the opportunity to get to know Claire’s friends and family, and Claire enjoyed being home after years of studying in the United States. After about a year in Sydney, Claire and Justin decided that they wanted to go to law school. Rather than pursuing a long distance relationship, the couple applied to the same schools, planning to go together. Both were excited to find out they had been admitted to William & Mary. Though they loved city life, they knew they wanted to study law in a quieter, more close-knit community, which made William & Mary the perfect fit.

Justin and Claire came to the law school as a couple, but they are pursuing their individual interests, are involved in different clubs and organizations. They have formed groups of friends on their own, while sharing mutual friends as well. They enjoy having each other as a support system, being able to study together, and discuss all they are learning.

In March of 2015, after spending a nice day in Richmond, Justin proposed to Claire at College Landing Park, just down the road from the Law School. Many of their classmates and professors were surprised at the engagement, thinking these 1Ls had only known each other for a matter of months! But Justin and Claire’s story spanned several years and multiple continents. They are thrilled to share their futures with one another.

This summer, Claire and Justin will be returning to New York City for summer associate positions at large law firms. Though they’ll be in the big city, their firms are located only a block apart, allowing for lunch dates and shared commutes. With Justin’s family living about an hour outside of New York City, the pair plans to work in New York after graduating next year. In the future, they hope to return to Australia as well, to be close to Claire’s family. Wherever life takes them after William & Mary, Claire and Justin are excited to be making the journey together!

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

From Paul’s Deli to New York City: Meredith and Matthew’s Story

satiraby John Satira, Class of 2017

In February of each year, we like to highlight some of the couples that have found love while at William & Mary Law School (you can find past stories here and here). This year, we are happy to showcase the love story of Meredith Hunt, J.D. ’14, and Matthew DeAtley, J.D. ‘13.

M&M DatingDepending on who you ask, you could get pretty different stories on how newlyweds Meredith Hunt and Matthew DeAtley first started their relationship. Meredith will say that she met second-year student Matthew at Paul’s Deli near the beginning of her first year at William & Mary Law School. Matthew, however, does not remember that interaction at all. The two do agree that, after first meeting each other (however it happened), they would often run into each other at the gym due to both sharing an enthusiasm for athletics and fitness. Meredith will then say that their first date was when she asked Matthew to go to the local coffee shop Aroma’s after he had been trying to ask her out for a year and a half. Matthew will claim the two’s first date was when he asked her to go to the DoG Street Pub.

Regardless as to how they first met or where they went on their first official date, Meredith and Matthew were able to make their relationship work after they started dating in early 2013. Matthew graduated in May of 2013 just as Meredith was preparing to start a summer associate position at the Simpson Thacher & Bartlett law firm in New York City. Matthew joined Meredith in New York City and studied for the bar exam there, and by the end of the summer, both returned to Virginia. Matthew began an associate position at Williams Mullen in Virginia Beach while Meredith returned to Williamsburg for her third-year as a law student. Throughout the year, Meredith would visit Matthew at his place in Norfolk each weekend.

M&M ProposalThe biggest change occurred in October of 2014. In one week, Matthew proposed to Meredith, the two moved into a new place in New York together, and both began new jobs at law firms in New York City. Meredith started as a first-year associate at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett focusing on mergers and acquisitions, while Matthew started a new job at Paul Hastings as an associate in its real estate group. With both working at large law firms, needless to say, the two’s engagement period was very busy, with most free time being devoted to wedding planning.

On January 2, 2016, the wedding day finally arrived. Meredith and Matthew were married in Meredith’s hometown of Palm Beach, Florida, in a large and well-attended ceremony. About thirty of the wedding guests were Meredith and Matthew’s former William & Mary Law School classmates. Now, as newlyweds, both Meredith and Matthew are happy to spend time with each other as a married couple, although the change that resulted from marriage is nothing compared to the week during which the two got engaged, moved to New York, and started new jobs.

We at William & Mary Law School wish Meredith and Matthew a happy and healthy marriage, and we are proud to have played a small part in bringing the two together!

M&M Wedding

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

Co-Counsel Program: Law Alumni Serving as Guides for Current Students

willisby Blake Willis, Class of 2018

No matter where you go to school and no matter what you want to do, there is likely someone who as already been there, already done that, and likely has learned a lot along the way. One of the benefits of coming along later is the ability to learn from the experiences of others, applying their knowledge to assist yourself in reaching your goals.

That is what the Co-Counsel program at William & Mary Law School attempts to do, by giving law students the opportunity to connect with alumni from around the country (and globe). These alumni willingly serve as resources for current law students to talk about school, job searching and life. These alumni often feel a connection to William & Mary and want to share their experiences with students.

As a 1L student, you will have to opportunity to sign up for this program during the first few weeks of school. You will also be given a list of alumni participants accompanied by their practice area of law, their geographic location, and a description of what they do, to better advice you on which lawyers may be a better fit for you. After that, you and your senior co-counsel will have an opportunity to connect and begin building a relationship.

There are few things that may be more valuable this early on than speaking with a lawyer who is currently practicing in that are, particularly as a student interested in a certain type of law and seeking more information about the practice area. Alumni will be able to give you insight on the pros and cons of the particular type of practice, maybe the geographic area where they practice, and even potential steps you can take to prepare yourself to be ready for a summer internship or externship in that field. They may also have advice for how to approach certain classes in school or different situations that you may encounter throughout your law school experience. All of this is useful information and can help better enable you to succeed in school and after.

No matter what your experience has been before law school and what you want to do in the future, you should absolutely sign up for this incredible (and unique) program here at W&M.

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

 

Hearing from an Alum in Criminal Law

newtonby Dakota Newton, Class of 2018

One of my favorite things about law school is listening to stories from the practicing attorneys and other speakers that professors and the school invite to campus. All of these people have good stories to tell, but I especially enjoy stories from the people who work in criminal justice. Nothing beats a good murder case, especially when the murderer was never caught.

On October 29, Professor Marcus invited Eddie Nickel, an Assistant Commonwealth Attorney from Richmond and 2007 graduate of the Law School, to talk with a group of 1Ls from his Criminal Law class. Eddie talked about his work as a prosecutor generally, the sort of cases he generally deals with, and how he manages to work through the seventy-plus cases that land on his desk each week (good judgment and long hours, if you are curious). He also discussed the full extent of his involvement as a prosecutor, which extends far beyond what I had ever thought.

Eddie’s job begins with talking to the police officers who are on patrol, so he can understand what challenges they are facing with previous offenders. On top of that, Eddia has a massive caseload, daily court appearances, data collection, recidivism analysis, and policy recommendation. So, if you are an excellent juggler and want to bear the responsibility of keeping the Virginia criminal justice system effective and equitable, then this may be the job for you.

Eddie Nickel

Eddie Nickel

After impressing us with his wide range of skills and prodigious work rate, Eddie settled into the stories, specifically a story of a suspected murderer in Richmond who has successfully evaded multiple convictions over the past quarter century but could be sentenced shortly if Eddie’s office is successful next month.

Overall, it was an excellent experience and a tantalizing glimpse of the careers that are just a few short years away.

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

See Eddie’s W&M Valentine’s post from 2011 here.

 

Interview with Amy Greer ’89, Public Service Fund Co-Founder

wentworthby Christie Wentworth, Class of 2017

Amy is a partner at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP.

Q: What sparked your interest in public service and pro bono work?

A: I have always been outwardly focused.  This may have been more an accident of birth than anything else, as I was an oldest child with responsibilities for my younger siblings, but for whatever reason, my biggest strengths have always been problem solving and personal interaction, which seem to be perfect qualities for this work.  I did not come from a family with lawyers in it, but I wanted to be a lawyer from a very early age, because they had the power to help others.  As far as I was concerned, public service and pro bono work were what lawyers did.

greer1Q: What inspired you to found the Public Service Fund?

A: Like so much of life, it was a happy accident.  Kathy Hessler ’88, a like-minded person, told me that other schools were doing programs like what became our Public Service Fund (PSF).  W&M had nothing available to support public interest work for students.  We identified a need and we filled it.  Together, and with the help of others, we considered what we thought we could accomplish, both in the short term and what PSF could be in the future and, acting with the support of the faculty and the administration, including Professors John Levy, Rob Kaplan, Jayne Barnard and then-Dean Sullivan, we got it off the ground.

Kathy Hessler ’88 and Amy Greer ’89, PSF Co-Founders

Kathy Hessler ’88 and Amy Greer ’89, PSF Co-Founders

Q: How did your time at W&M shape or encourage your commitment to public service?

A: Nothing succeeds like success, I guess.  The fact that PSF was so well received was very energizing for me — and the fact that the work being done was so inspiring to others and so meaningful to those being helped.

Q: What have you found to be the most meaningful way to stay involved in the community as a lawyer?

A: Legal work is very demanding of your time.  I have had periods of very significant community involvement and others when I have been less so, depending on my career demands.  However, I think the key is to commit to issues and organizations that you genuinely care about – that always makes it much easier to make the time.  And, though it may seem counterintuitive, given my last statement, I also try to find other ways to stay involved based solely on time commitment – like quick clinics, with real person-to-person interaction: helpful to clients, meaningful to me, and not a lot of time commitment.

Q: Do you have any advice for current law students or recent graduates who would like to continue to serve others?

A: Just do it.  And don’t feel bad about yourself when your life gets in the way.  Keep trying.

Learn more about our Student Bloggers here.

See the original post here.

How to Get the Dean to Shave His Mustache…

Last fall, Dean Douglas promised that if the Class of 2014 reached 75 percent participation in its Class Gift effort, he would shave his 30-years-in-the-making mustache.

On April 17, the participation rate hit more than 85 percent–and out came the razor…

Watch the video below!

To date, the Class of 2014 has 90% participation, due to the hard work of 20 member class gift committee. Read more about the 3L class gift here.

From the Law School Library to the Altar

It’s that time of year– Virginia is for lovers, and we love to share posts about couples who met during their tenure at William & Mary Law School.

by Lindsay Sfekas, Class of 2016

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Mary-Carson Saunders, Class of 2013, met her husband Josh Stiff during her first semester 1L year in the library during finals week, with intentions of getting some serious studying done. She speaks fondly of the moment she sat down next to Josh in the library, and he was watching a Youtube video of a parody of law school and giggling to himself.  He enticed her to take a break from studying and watch the rest of the video with him.

As luck, or fate, would have it, Mary-Carson and Josh lived right across the street from one another.  They became fast friends over pot luck dinners, trivia nights, and movie nights with their mutual friends.  During their spring semester, they began dating.  Williamsburg turned out to be a great place to date for these two outdoors loving people.  In fact, their first date was at Jamestown Beach, which is a local beach close to Williamsburg.  Other dates consisted of walking through Colonial Williamsburg, spending time in York River State Park, walking in the College Woods, canoeing on the Chickahominy River, and swimming in the river at Jamestown Beach.

At William & Mary Law School, the two became involved in the George Wythe Society and in the Inns of Court, a leadership networking organization.

During their 3L year, Mary-Carson and Josh returned to Jamestown Beach, the site of their first date, and Josh proposed.  The two were married in Suffolk, Virginia (Mary-Carson’s hometown) on October 5, 2013 with almost 20 of their classmates in attendance.

View More: http://httpkristinpartincom.pass.us/stiffwedding      View More: http://httpkristinpartincom.pass.us/stiffwedding

Mary-Carson and Josh live in Norfolk, Virgina where she works for the Law School and he a small bankruptcy firm.  When asked about whether she expected to meet her husband in law school, Mary-Carson says, “Absolutely not! I never dreamed in a million years!”

Learn more about our Student Bloggers here.

Lawyers in In-House Practice

by Lauren Bridenbaugh, Class of 2016

From September 19-20, I attended several sessions at the Lawyers in In-House Practice Conference hosted by the Law School. In-house counsel are lawyers who work in management and/or are employed directly by companies to do legal work. It is estimated that 8 to 10 percent of lawyers are “business lawyers.” The event featured 20 female William & Mary Law School alumnae discussing a variety of topics related to their work as in-house counsel.

Inhouse CounselThe first session I attended was on “What Issues Keep In-House Counsel Awake at Night?” where the panelists discussed privacy concerns, regulatory compliance and cyber-security as some of the key issues they are facing in their respective fields. Other sessions I attended talked about similarities and differences between in-house counsel and compliance professionals and the work they do as well as what in-house counsel expects from outside lawyers. These sessions were especially helpful in learning more about who does what in corporate legal work and the differences in the expectations and type of work done in different industries.

Inhouse CounselThe Conference was also interesting because I was able to see the varied fields female alumnae of William & Mary have found success, including energy, finance, healthcare, insurance and telecommunications among others. It is encouraging to see the success these William & Mary graduates have found across these varied industries throughout the country.

Learn more about our Student Bloggers here.

W&M Law Super Lawyers

Super LawyersThe Super Lawyers list has been published, and 631 William & Mary Law School alumni have made the list. Super Lawyers is a rating service of outstanding lawyers from all different practice areas. They are deemed Super Lawyers based on peer recognition and professional achievement.

Of particular note to the Admission Office are the Super Lawyers who also volunteer their time as Alumni Admission Ambassador. Our Alumni Ambassadors take time out of their busy lives, both professionally and personally, to speak to and to meet with prospective and admitted students. 73 W&M Super Lawyers are also Alumni Admission Ambassadors.

Congratulations to all of our William & Mary Super Lawyers!

Click here to see a full list of William & Mary Law School alumni who were named Super Lawyers.

Recent Grad Wins Prize in Intellectual Property

Congratulations to Jarred O. Taylor ’13 for winning an award in the American Intellectual Property Law Educational Foundation’s annual Jan Jancin Award Competition!

Jarred Taylor

The award is sponsored by the Virginia State Bar and honors an outstanding law student, either from Virginia or attending a Virginia law school, who has excelled in the study of Intellectual Property law and intends to pursue a career in that field.

Jarred will soon be joining the Palo Alto, Ca., office of Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati. Congrats Jarred!

Being a Citizen Lawyer

William & Mary Law School was founded under the ideals of the citizen lawyer. Our students, faculty, and alumni are trained to be good lawyers, but also good citizens and leaders in their respective communities.

Over graduation weekend, we saw many examples of how our community epitomizes the citizen-lawyer model.

Judy Conti J.D. ’94 received the 2013 Citizen-Lawyer Award for demonstrating outstanding leadership and citizenship in her work. In 2000, Conti co-founded the Employment Justice Center, which provides free legal advice to low-wage workers in the District of Columbia. Conti was the Executive Director for seven years, and under her leadership, the organization assisted 10,000 workers. Conti continues to be an advocate for workers as the federal advocacy coordinator for the National Employment Law Project.

Chris Rey J.D. ’10 received the 2013 Taylor Reveley Award from the William & Mary Law School Alumni Association. The award is given to an alumnus or alumna who has graduated within 10 years and has demonstrated a strong commitment to public service. Rey enlisted in the Army during his senior year in college and served for seven years. During law school, Rey served as a member of the Electoral College, representing Virginia’s first congressional district in 2008 and was the first African-American presidential elector in the history of Virginia. In 2011, Ray ran for mayor in his hometown of Spring Lake, N.C. and secured 76 percent of the vote and serves as mayor today.

Professors Susan Grover and Trotter Hardy were the 2013 recipients of the John Marshall Award. The award is given to a member, or members, of the Law School faculty or staff who has demonstrated selfless service to the Law School community.

In one of the nomination letters for Susan Grover, a student wrote:  “Susan Grover embodies all of the qualities of the John Marshall Award. She is compassionate. She is brilliant. She continually reminds students that we are, in her words, part of a community who cares. When she sees students struggling, whether academically or emotionally, she does not always wait for them to come through her door, though her door is always open, but she seeks them out to make sure that they know that resources are there to help them, and that she cares. She is humble, generous with her time, and quite possibly the best listener I have ever encountered.”

Trotter Hardy retires after teaching at William & Mary for 31 years. He was the first intellectual property professor and served for over 10 years as the Dean for Technology. One nominator said: “Beyond his excellent classroom teaching, Professor Hardy has provided tremendous service to the Law School as the dean of technology. He always reaches out to students for their feedback whenever technology changes are being made. Best of all, he is just an all-around great guy.”

Congratulations to our Citizen Lawyers!