The Department of Justice Environment and Natural Resources Division

zimmermanby Liesel Zimmerman, Class of 2017

On October 4, 2016, the Office of Career Services, the Student Environmental & Animal Law Society, and the Virginia Coastal Policy Center hosted “Careers in Environmental Law and with the DOJ,” featuring attorneys from the Department of Justice Environment and Natural Resources Division. Students had the opportunity to hear from William & Mary Law School alumna Patricia McKenna, who serves as General Counsel for the Environment and Natural Resources Division (ENRD). The Deputy Section Chief of the ENRD Appellate Section, Andrew Mergen, also presented at the event.

The ENRD is comprised of 635 employees, including 451 attorneys. The Division operates primarily from its headquarters in Washington, D.C. but also has a number of field offices in locations such as San Francisco, Denver and Boston. ENRD attorneys represent the United States and various federal agencies; sometimes bringing affirmative cases against companies and municipalities, and sometimes defending the federal government against suit.

DOJ ENRDMs. McKenna and Mr. Mergen explained the diverse roles of each of the 10 specialized sections within the ENRD. For instance, in the Wildlife and Marine Resources Division, litigators defend cases brought under Federal Wildlife and Marine Species Conservation laws, including the Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and the Marine Mammal Protection Act. The lawyers in the Environmental Crimes Section work closely with United States Attorneys’ Offices to prosecute organizations and individuals who violate the federal laws that protect our country’s natural resources. The Environmental Enforcement Section handles the civil side of those cases, working extensively with Superfund, The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Clean Air Act, and the Clean Water Act. Attorneys assess the amount of damages that respondents’ actions have caused the environment, and they sue for damages accordingly. The Land Acquisition Section handles condemnation cases and proprietary matters. Of all the sections, the Land Acquisition Section takes the most cases to trial. The Law and Policy Section is responsible for coordinating the ENRD’s international work. They also review pending regulations and legislation. The Appellate Section handles appeals from every litigation division and prides itself on giving new attorneys practical experience arguing in the Federal Court of Appeals early on in their careers.

At the conclusion of the program, the attorneys provided insight into opportunities for interning and working at the ENRD. One of the most appealing aspects of their jobs is that they are always doing something different. In an evolving field like environmental law, every case presents its own interesting new challenges. Having Ms. McKenna and Mr. Mergen speak at the Law School provided an invaluable opportunity for students to gain an inside look at the workings of the ENRD.

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

Opportunity to Attend the Local Government Attorney’s Conference

willisby Blake Willis, Class of 2018

A major part of law school is networking, and William & Mary certainly provides its share of opportunities for students to meet practitioners and learn from their experiences. One recent example is the opportunity to attend the Virginia Local Government Attorney’s Conference, which was held here in Williamsburg at the end of October. The three-day conference was held at the Kingsmill Resort, just miles from the Law School, on Oct. 28-30. Each year, the conference provides a scholarship for law students who are interested in working for or with local governments in Virginia to attend – and this year, four William & Mary Law students had the privilege of attending. The conference took place over the course of three days, and had sessions which covered a variety of topics ranging from property and rezoning, foster care, new case law, employment law, conflicts of interest, legislative actions, negotiations and parliamentary procedure, bonds and pro bono work. Each session was conducted by practicing attorneys in Virginia, both those who work for the state and those who work in private practice. Attending the conference allows students the chance to hear from real lawyers who work in these areas every day, and to gather valuable information about what the practice of law is really like. The Law School has a great reputation for its commitment to public service, and this conference is a great way to learn more about public service as an avenue to practice law.

In addition to the educational sessions, the conference holds multiple social events, including happy hours, and a dinner reception. As a student attendee, these events are a great time to go and network with attorneys from across the state with whom a common interest may be shared. Further, many of these attorneys are alumni of William & Mary Law School and are always happy to meet and talk with current students. In addition, they love to hear about the current state of the law school and of Williamsburg. While the conference is not always held in Williamsburg, students do attend every year, and it’s a great opportunity to learn, meet attorneys and network, and to have fun.

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

2016 Thanksgiving Baskets

zaleskiby James Zaleski, Class of 2019

Every year William & Mary’s Black Law Students Association (BLSA) hosts a Thanksgiving Basket Competition at the Law School in order to collect food items for local families. First-year law students compete as sections of the legal practice program against other sections to create displays from canned and boxed foods in the lobby of the law school. Displays are graded on creativity, the diversity of products, and the quantity of goods.

Assault and BatteryThe competition officially began on Monday night, and sections soon began to bring in their canned goods and assemble their displays. It was exciting to walk into the lobby and see displays become more elaborate by the hour. The displays were evaluated during the lunch hour on Wednesday by two professors, a law student, and a representative from the Dean’s office. This year Section 8’s entry, “Assault and Battery”, reigned supreme by winning 1st place in all three categories: Best Content, Most Creative Display, and Judge’s Choice for overall winner. Other notable entries were Section 15’s “Supreme Court” and Section 7’s “Photo Booth.” Congratulations to Section 8 for winning this year!

TurkeyThe Thanksgiving Basket Competition was a great opportunity for the Law School community to come together before the holidays, and it provided students with a much-needed break from studying. Over 2,000 canned goods and boxed foods were collected during the competition which were donated to Campus Kitchen which organizes the donations and assembles Thanksgiving baskets for local Williamsburg families. Campus Kitchen seeks to address the hunger and nutritional needs of the community and works to foster connections between college and community.  I thoroughly enjoyed this year’s competition, and as we approach Thanksgiving, I would just like to say that I am thankful for having such a great section, fellow, and community here at William & Mary Law School. Happy Thanksgiving!

To read the William & Mary Law news story, click here.

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

Federalist Society, American Constitutional Society Host Panel on Felons and the Right to Vote

willisby Blake Willis, Class of 2018

2016 has been a year for elections. Not only is it a presidential election year, but there have also been numerous law suits surrounding election issues around the country. In April, Virginia made headlines as its governor signed an executive order re-instating the civil rights (namely the right to vote) of 206,000 convicted felons who had completed their sentences and supervised probation. The order was called unprecedented, challenged by members of the state legislature, and eventually stricken by the Supreme Court of Virginia. It also reinvigorated a national debate about the rights of those who have been convicted of crimes.

blakeOn November 2, the Federalist Society and American Constitution Society, two national groups with student branches at William & Mary Law School, hosted a debate on the issue of felon’s rights when it comes to voting. The debate was moderated by William & Mary professor, Rebecca Green, who teaches Election Law at the Law School, and also acts as a supervisor for the Election Law Society, another student group. The debate featured 2 prominent speakers in the election law field, Hans von Spakovsky of the Heritage Foundation, in Washington, D.C., and Hope Amezquita from the ACLU in Virginia. Over the course of the debate, the two speakers discussed the policies behind different arguments both for and against felon’s rights to vote, when they should be taken away, and how they should be returned. Additionally, the two speakers took questions from the audience, a packed room of students all eager to hear what the speakers had to say.

blake 2In addition to sharing their thoughts on a hotly debated legal issue, the two speakers also took time to share a bit about each of themselves, their paths to where they are today, and advice for students who are looking for opportunities to work at the nexus of law and elections – a growing field.

The talk is yet another example of the tremendous opportunities for students at William & Mary Law School to learn from experts and tonetwork with attorneys from around the country.

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

Career Conversations: A Summer at the U.S. Attorney’s Office

zimmermanby Liesel Zimmerman, Class of 2018

During the lunch hour on Thursday, October 20, the Law School lobby was bustling with people, participating in the Office of Career Services’ Career Conversations Program. Second-year and third-year students stood wearing nametags and smiles, eager to share stories of their internships from the previous summer. The Office of Career Services (OCS) arranged for students from a variety of legal backgrounds to meet with 1Ls to get them thinking about their upcoming summer job search. The interns provided a range of perspectives, from summer associates at large law firms, to summer research assistants, to interns at non-profits, to summer law clerks for federal judges, among others.

Blog1During Career Conversations, I had the opportunity to talk to interested 1Ls about my summer as a law clerk at the United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of New York. I am originally from the Buffalo area, and I intend to return there to practice, so I was thrilled to gain experience within the legal market I hope to work in after graduation.

The U.S. Attorney and Assistant U.S. Attorneys serve as federal prosecutors, representing the United States in all federal cases that arise within the 17 counties of Western New York. The office is comprised of a Criminal Division, a Civil Division, and an Appellate Division. I was assigned to three supervising attorneys in the Criminal Division, who acted as mentors over the course of my internship. Each handled a unique caseload and specialized in specific types of crimes, so I learned a great deal about a broad range of cases.

Blog3My daily routine consisted of working in the law library with my fellow law clerks on legal research tasks from our respective supervising attorneys. I often accompanied my attorneys to District Court and observed court proceedings as well. On days when high profile defendants were appearing in court, the media would often stop my attorneys at the door and ask for their comments. It was incredible to have the “inside scoop” on the confidential details of these cases before they were made public!

One such case, handled by the Chief of the Criminal Division, dealt with a civil rights violation. The crime in question took place the week before I began my internship, so I had the chance to see the case evolve from the very beginning. I participated in witness interviews and meetings with opposing counsel and the FBI agents investigating the case. I also completed a legal memorandum that helped determine whether additional individuals should face charges.

Another of my supervising attorneys, who works within the Narcotics and Organized Crime Section, handled a well-known and highly publicized Buffalo narcotics case. I was able to sit in on court proceedings and contribute research to help build the case against the defendant. I also wrote a memorandum on the admissibility of hearsay evidence, which was then submitted to the District Court on my supervisor’s behalf.

Blog2Under my third supervising attorney, I learned a great deal about Human Trafficking prosecutions, an area for which I have a particular passionate. I participated in meetings of the Western District of New York Human Trafficking Task Force and Alliance, wherein representatives from numerous agencies meet to create a unified force against human trafficking in Western New York. I also wrote a memorandum that evaluated the probability of success in prosecuting a potential defendant for harboring and concealing a fugitive.

In addition to all the practical knowledge I gained by putting my writing and researching skills to use, my attorneys taught me how to be a successful professional in the legal field. My summer at the US Attorney’s Office confirmed my desire to become a prosecutor, and I was grateful to get to share my experience with my peers.

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

Pumpkin Picking with the Women’s Law Society!

alsawafby Sami Alsawaf, Class of 2017

As someone from Florida, living in Virginia has opened up my eyes to a whole new world—mainly that seasons other than summer do, in fact, exist. Since arriving in Williamsburg three years ago, I have enjoyed every moment of the changing weather, but no season is more breathtaking than fall. The air is crisp, the leaves turn gorgeous shades of red and orange, and of course, everything is pumpkin flavored.

pumpkinsOn October 16th, the Women’s Law Society took a trip to College Run Farms to pick pumpkins! Having never actually picked a pumpkin in my life, I was unabashedly excited. On a joint social with the Christian Legal Society, we left from the Law School and headed on our way. To get to the farm, we rode on a ferry across the James River. We drove our cars onto the ferry, and once on board, we headed to the bow of the ship to take in the views and the fresh air.

Upon arrival on the other side of the river, we made our way to the farm. College Run had dozens and dozens of pumpkins to choose from, any shape any size—some fit in the size of your hand and some taller than a five-year-old. I personally chose a pumpkin with a blue hue, while one friend chose a perfectly shaped orange one and another picked one great for making pies. The farm also had a corn maze and freshly made pumpkin ice cream. The ice cream was like no other, and a perfect way to end our trip.

The farm was full of families having seasonal fun, and law students taking a break from studying for classes. Law school is busy and stressful, but it’s important to take a break every once in a while to remember there is life outside the four walls of this building, and more importantly, take time to be with your friends. Your friends will be with you throughout the entire three years of school, and it’s okay to take a lazy Sunday afternoon to enjoy some pumpkin ice cream (with four spoons).

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

Summer Work Experience at Maryland Office of the Attorney General

by Sami Alsawaf, Class of 201alsawaf7

When I first started law school, I was very interested in health care and health insurance. I spent my 1L summer at the National Women’s Law Center in DC, and for my 2L summer, I wanted to see a different side of insurance. This summer I worked at the Maryland Office of the Attorney General in the Insurance Fraud Division.

As luck would have it, it was one of the best job experiences I ever had. I knew going in that trials are nothing like you see on TV, but personally, I found real trials more exciting than what you find on ABC on Thursday night. Trying to follow the prosecutor’s line of questioning to see where he would end up; watching the defense attorney discredit a witness in subtle questions—every move is calculated to achieve a certain result. Every day I learned something new—not just about insurance, but about criminal law, the criminal justice system, and trial tips and strategies. I learned how to think outside the box. What is the best evidence to support a specific element of the crime? How can you show that someone acted negligently, if there was no one around to see the act? Thinking critically and trying to get inside the mind of a jury is essential to winning a case.

In between working and watching trials, I also had the chance to explore downtown Baltimore some. I lived just blocks away from the Inner Harbor, where I would spend my Sunday mornings running along the water front. The city has a culture all to its own, and each neighborhood has a unique vibe. There were plenty of top-notch restaurants and great places to shop. There were always events happening as well—art festivals, concerts, block parties. I am thinking about going back to Baltimore full time, and after my summer, I know it is a great place to live.

I am excited to finish my final year of law school, but I will miss working at the Office of the Attorney General. The people who work in criminal law love what they do, and it shows. The passion and the fire to ensure that justice is served is infectious, and it made me want to work to work to serve justice too. The people in my office were welcoming, instructive, and went out of their way to make sure I had a great experience and learned about criminal justice. Because of the way my office took me under their wing, I am now considering a career in criminal law. Justice—it’s right in the name of the criminal justice system. I have always wanted to work to make sure everyone has a fair chance, and this summer opened my eyes to a way to achieve just that.

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

Reading Groups Make for Lively Discussions Among Faculty and New Students

by Vinayak Balasubramanianvinayak, Class of 2019. Blog post reproduced with permission of the Communications Office.

There are many fears that are common among incoming law students. For some, there is nothing scarier than an unsolicited interaction with one of those incredibly smart law professors at the front of each classroom.

But that was not the case at Chowning’s Tavern in Colonial Williamsburg, where six 1L students gathered with Professor Thomas J. McSweeney on a hot August day to discuss “The Return of Martin Guerre” by historian Natalie Zemon Davis. The book explores a legendary sixteenth-century French legal case.

As they sipped on cold beverages and enjoyed some appetizers, the group engaged in a lively chat about various themes presented in the book, including the French legal system in the Middle Ages, the role of women during that time period, and the growth of state power over the church. Over the course of that discussion, the students connected with the professor and got to know each other.

“One of my goals was to get people talking to each other, and I thought that went very well,” McSweeney said, reflecting on the meeting. “There were interesting questions and reactions, and the conversation was very lively and collegial.”

Professor Thomas J. McSweeney, second from left, and 1L students discussed "The Return of Martin Guerre" during a get-together at Chowning's Tavern.

Professor Thomas J. McSweeney, second from left, and 1L students discussed “The Return of Martin Guerre” during a get-together at Chowning’s Tavern.

McSweeney’s group is one of 14 led by faculty that make up William & Mary Law School’s 1L Reading Group Program. Among the books chosen this year by participating faculty for discussion were “The Autobiography of an Execution” by David R. Dow, “Gideon’s Trumpet” by Anthony Lewis, and “Between the World and Me” by Ta-Nehisi Coates. (See this year’s list of books and faculty discussion leaders.) According to Rhianna Shabsin, Senior Assistant Dean for Admission, there were 159 1L participants this year (more than two-thirds of the new class).

Over the summer, all incoming 1L students were sent an email inviting them to sign up for a group. Professors then reached out to the students in their groups to schedule a time and place to meet. Many groups met at restaurants or at professors’ homes.

Vice Dean Laura Heymann said the program was launched in 2015 to provide new students with an opportunity to get to know the school’s faculty and to expose students to legal topics in a casual setting.

The reading groups covered a large array of legal topics, including legal history, religion, terrorism, race, criminal justice, and feminism. They were all designed to help students think about the law and to prompt discussions about important legal and social issues.

For example, McSweeney said he chose “The Return of Martin Guerre” because it helps provide a framework for students to understand legal texts. He said that the story is constructed using facts from depositions that later permit the judge—and by extension the reader—to draw conclusions about the heroes and villains.

“It helps us understand how legal actors become characters in a story,” he said. “Events may not have significance at the time of occurrence, but they must come together in the end to tell the story.”

Kelly Ann McCarthy, a 1L student in McSweeney’s group, said that she participated in the program because she thought it would be a good opportunity to get to know a professor outside of class, as well as an excuse to read something other than a legal casebook.

“It was interesting to see how students applied what we were learning in class to non-class materials, and how different aspects of the law met in one place,” she said. “It was also interesting to see how records of legal proceedings provide a window into a different time.”

Heymann said that she had received very positive feedback about this year’s program.

“Both students and faculty seemed to have really enjoyed the experience,” she said. “I’ve heard from some students that the books they discussed caused them to see things in new ways, both within and outside the classroom.”

Supreme Court Preview Provides a Special Look at the Future of Election Law

willisby Blake Willis, Class of 2018

The news lately has been full of different election law issues. While it is a presidential election year, with plenty of news-worthy stories, there have been numerous court cases from around the country in recent months which are appearing to reshape the way that the legal community looks at election laws. William & Mary is known for having one of the oldest and strongest Election Law Programs in the country. This year, the Supreme Court Preview, hosted by the Institute of Bill of Rights Law (IBRL), featured a high-powered panel which focused on the Court’s possible future in this highly charged area of the law. Moderated by Professor Rebecca Green, the Chair of the Election Law Program at the Law School, the panel featured four of the most prominent Election Law experts in the country, including: Paul Smith (Jenner & Block), Paul Clement (former Solicitor General) , Pam Karlan (Stanford Law School) and Lyle Denniston (SCOTUSBlog).

One of many panels that occurred as part of the Supreme Court Preview.

One of many panels that occurred as part of the Supreme Court Preview.

These experts focused on a number of different election issues including racial gerrymandering, the Voting Rights Act, race and politics in elections, voter suppression, different types of court review, and whether or not the court should even be involved in this area of the law. One thing they all certainly agreed upon, was that this area of the law is incredibly exciting and one of the most volatile areas of legal study occurring right now.

This is but one example of many from the Supreme Court Preview this month. The Preview, which takes place every September, features a Moot Court demonstration by some of the nation’s leading appellate advocates, and sessions focused on criminal law, civil rights, the Court and the 2016 Election, Business Law, Race and the Legal system, the legacy of Justice Scalia, and the current Supreme Court with only 8 members. Each year, the Preview is attended by numerous students, faculty, legal experts and practitioners from around the country and members of the public. It is one of the most popular events at the school and definitely something to look forward to each and every year, especially in years like 2016, where there is no shortage of legal debate around the country.

Click here to learn more about the Supreme Court Preview.

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

 

1L Perspective- The First Month

zaleskiby James Zaleski, Class of 2019

Just like that the first month of law school has come to an end! It has been a month filled with stress, late nights, and exhaustion but I have thoroughly enjoyed the experience. Now is a good time to reflect back on the first month of this crazy transformative experience we call law school.

Classes have consumed the majority of my time this first month. All 1Ls take the same classes during the first year. The classes I am taking this semester include: (1) Criminal Law, (2) Civil Procedure, (3) Torts, (4) Legal Writing, and (5) Lawyering Skills. One of the rumors about law school that I quickly found to be true is the copious amount of reading! Law school professors assign multiple cases for each class. The readings are complex and often the main point of the case is not particularly clear. I frequently find myself reading the cases multiple times. However, after just one month of practice, I know my classmates and I are increasing our proficiency and are on our way to becoming savvy case readers.

The professors are some of the most brilliant and accomplished instructors I have had in my academic career. As a former high school teacher, I have an appreciation for excellent teachers. All of my professors are experts in their field; they have a passion for teaching their material and challenging students to think critically about the law. One way professors cultivate this atmosphere of learning is through the Socratic Method. I received a personal introduction to the practice during the first week of classes. My classmates and I have found that the rumors regarding the Socratic Method to be overblown. The Socratic Method ensures everyone comes to class prepared. It keeps the class engaged and challenges students to arrive at key insights. While everyone was nervous the first week, I feel most people have become accustomed to the method and enjoy the rigorous discussion it provides.

I also spent a lot of time this past week preparing for my first law school exam. While most law school classes only have final exams, several professors offer midterms. These midterms help relieve some of the anxiety over final exams because they serve as a good introduction to the law school exam format. In preparation, I reviewed my class notes and I completed my first outline. The professor also provided a hypothetical that I used to practice responses. The most challenging aspect of the exam was the time crunch! My classmates and I are anxiously awaiting the results.

student orgsOutside of class, I have found myself busy attending interest meetings for many student groups. I have attended meetings for the Immigration and Law Service Society, the Military and Veterans Law Society, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mock Trial, and the Latino Law Student Association. These meetings are great opportunities to learn about the organization, to meet new people with similar interests, and to learn how to become involved as a 1L. A nice perk is all of them provided lunch!

The first month of law school has been a demanding experience. However, after just one month, I can already tell I am receiving a valuable education, and I am on my way to becoming an excellent attorney.

To learn more about our student bloggers, click here.

Meet the 2016-17 Student Bloggers

The Admission Office is lucky to have a number of student bloggers lending their writing talents to us by posting about their law school experiences throughout the year. 

Learn more about them below!

alsawafI’m Sami Alsawaf, and I am a 3L from Melbourne, Florida where I attended the University of Florida. While there, I majored in Political Science and Psychology. I was involved with College Democrats and worked as a research assistant in the Psychology Department. As a  junior, I had the opportunity to intern at the State Capitol in Tallahassee where I worked in the Office of Economic and Demographic Research. I decided to come to William & Mary because I truly felt like the school cared about my best interest–they weren’t going to let me fall through the cracks. When I visited, everyone was so nice and genuine that I could tell people weren’t putting on a show for me. Everyone here is welcoming and always willing to work together. In addition to the sense of community, I also really loved the Williamsburg area. The area is just so beautiful! I’m also involved in a few activities. I’m President of the Women’s Law Society and an Articles Editor for the Journal of Women and the Law.

grecoMy name is Marc Greco, and I am a 2L from the Bronx, New York. I attended college at Boston University, where I majored in Philosophy and was an active member of the Kappa Sigma Fraternity. At William & Mary, I am a member of Law Review and the intramural softball team. When I am not busy with law school life, I enjoy playing sports, listening to music, and going to concerts.

kaiserMy name is Alyssa Kaiser, and I am a 1L from the small town of Belvidere, New Jersey. I am a 2016 graduate of Seton Hall University in New Jersey, majoring in Psychology and Political Science. Deciding to attend law school was a natural decision for me, as I have always been attracted to the practice of law. Whether it be from my high school days, during which I obsessively watched trials on television, to my undergraduate career, where I had the opportunity to more concretely confirm my passion for the law through internships and research opportunities, my excitement has never wavered. William & Mary stood out to me among other law schools, and I find myself especially impressed by their commitment to create “citizen lawyers.” I am eager to find out what this first year of law school has in store for me and the rest of the Class of 2019!

stithI’m Mitch Stith, and I am a 3L from Columbus, Ohio. Prior to law school, I attended Capital University where I majored in Spanish and Political Science and was a student-athlete, competing on the cross country and track and field teams. At William & Mary, I am a member of the Law School’s Alternative Dispute Resolution team and the College’s club cross country team. Following graduation, I plan to return to Ohio.

zimmermanMy name is Liesel Zimmerman, and I am a 2L originally from Niagara Falls, New York. I graduated from the State University of New York at Geneseo in 2015 with a Bachelor of Arts in English Literature. This past summer, I was a Law Clerk at the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of New York. I enjoyed my experience so much that it has confirmed my interest in becoming a prosecutor. Here at William & Mary, I am involved in the Christian Legal Society, the Moot Court Team, the Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity, and the William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law.

willisMy name is Blake Willis, I am a 2L from Eastford, Connecticut. I attended Seton Hall University in New Jersey, where I studied International Relations. I was an active member of the Zeta Psi Fraternity and graduated from SHU in December, 2014. I came to William & Mary Law School because of its commitment to creating “citizen lawyers” and the active community that the school embodies. At W&M, I am involved in the Student Bar Association as a 2L class representative, the Federalist Society, Election Law Society, and the Bill of Rights Journal. I spent my 1L summer at the Virginia Department of Elections in Richmond.

zaleskiI’m James Zaleski, and I am a 1L from Midlothian, Virginia. I completed by undergraduate studies at Virginia Tech in 2014 where I received my Bachelor of Arts in Spanish with a second major in International Studies. I spent the past two years teaching Spanish in rural South Carolina as an AmeriCorps member with Teach for America. I chose William & Mary Law School because of its vision of developing citizen lawyers and its strong commitment to public service. I am currently serving as the Public Service Admission Ambassador, and I look forward to beginning my legal studies at the oldest law school in the country!

viagra buy